logo

Grimgrains

Unnamed repository; edit this file 'description' to name the repository.
commit: b9612c40b3691dd2025cdc226fa7c5643648737b
parent f4e7930dffe361b8c32d7e80e9a46d27e8cb870a
Author: rekkabell <rekkabell@gmail.com>
Date:   Thu,  2 Jan 2020 13:18:09 -0500

changed date

Diffstat:

Msite/about.html4++--
Msite/acorn_squash.html4++--
Msite/active_dry_yeast.html4++--
Msite/agar_agar_powder.html4++--
Msite/alfalfa_sprouts.html4++--
Msite/all_purpose_flour.html4++--
Msite/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce.html4++--
Msite/anise_seeds.html4++--
Msite/ao_nori.html4++--
Msite/apple.html4++--
Msite/apple_cider_vinegar.html4++--
Msite/apricot_jam.html4++--
Msite/arame.html4++--
Msite/arame_soba.html4++--
Msite/arrowroot_starch.html4++--
Msite/arugula.html4++--
Msite/avocado.html4++--
Msite/baguette.html4++--
Msite/baking_powder.html4++--
Msite/baking_soda.html4++--
Msite/balsamic_banana_ice_cream.html4++--
Msite/balsamic_vinegar.html4++--
Msite/bamboo_charcoal_powder.html4++--
Msite/banana.html4++--
Msite/bartlett_pear.html4++--
Msite/basic_black_bread.html4++--
Msite/basic_toothpaste.html4++--
Msite/basil.html4++--
Msite/basmati_rice.html4++--
Msite/bay_leaf.html4++--
Msite/beans.html4++--
Msite/beer.html4++--
Msite/beer_bread.html4++--
Msite/beets.html4++--
Msite/beluga_lentils.html4++--
Msite/beni_shouga.html4++--
Msite/black_glutinous_rice.html4++--
Msite/black_olives.html4++--
Msite/black_pepper.html4++--
Msite/black_sesame_brittle.html4++--
Msite/black_sesame_rice_pancakes.html4++--
Msite/black_sesame_seeds.html4++--
Msite/black_sesame_syrup.html4++--
Msite/blackberries.html4++--
Msite/bok_choy.html4++--
Msite/borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.html4++--
Msite/bread_crusts.html4++--
Msite/breadfruit.html4++--
Msite/breadfruit_flour.html4++--
Msite/breadfruit_gnocchi.html4++--
Msite/breadfruit_pasta.html4++--
Msite/brown_lentils.html4++--
Msite/brown_rice_syrup.html4++--
Msite/brown_sugar.html4++--
Msite/brussel_sprouts.html4++--
Msite/buckwheat_flour.html4++--
Msite/buckwheat_groats.html4++--
Msite/buckwheat_noodles.html4++--
Msite/buckwheat_tea.html4++--
Msite/bull_kelp_powder.html4++--
Msite/burmese_tofu.html4++--
Msite/button_mushrooms.html4++--
Msite/canola_oil.html4++--
Msite/carob.html4++--
Msite/carob_chips.html4++--
Msite/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu.html4++--
Msite/carrots.html4++--
Msite/cassava.html4++--
Msite/cauliflower.html4++--
Msite/cavatappi.html4++--
Msite/cayenne_pepper.html4++--
Msite/cayenne_pepper_powder.html4++--
Msite/cheese.html4++--
Msite/chia_seeds.html4++--
Msite/chickpea_flour.html4++--
Msite/chickpea_salad_sandwich.html4++--
Msite/chickpeas.html4++--
Msite/chili_pepper_flakes.html4++--
Msite/chili_peppers.html4++--
Msite/chili_pomegranate_brownies.html4++--
Msite/chives.html4++--
Msite/chocolate_chip_cookies.html4++--
Msite/chocolate_chips.html4++--
Msite/cinnamon.html4++--
Msite/cocoa_beans.html4++--
Msite/cocoa_powder.html4++--
Msite/coconut_milk.html4++--
Msite/coconut_oil.html4++--
Msite/coconut_sugar.html4++--
Msite/coffee.html4++--
Msite/coffee_jelly.html4++--
Msite/coriander.html4++--
Msite/corn_dumplings.html4++--
Msite/corn_semolina.html4++--
Msite/corn_tortillas.html4++--
Msite/cornmeal.html4++--
Msite/cornstarch.html4++--
Msite/crackers.html4++--
Msite/crimini.html4++--
Msite/cucumber.html4++--
Msite/cumin_seeds.html4++--
Msite/curry_powder.html4++--
Msite/daikon.html4++--
Msite/dark_gyoza.html4++--
Msite/date_caramel.html4++--
Msite/dates.html4++--
Msite/deglet_noor_dates.html4++--
Msite/dijon_mustard.html4++--
Msite/dried_basil.html4++--
Msite/dried_cranberries.html4++--
Msite/dried_hijiki.html4++--
Msite/dried_orange_peel.html4++--
Msite/dried_raisins.html4++--
Msite/dried_white_mulberries.html4++--
Msite/dry_corn_kernels.html4++--
Msite/edamame.html4++--
Msite/eggplant.html4++--
Msite/einkorn_wheat_flour.html4++--
Msite/flax_seeds.html4++--
Msite/fleur_de_sel.html4++--
Msite/flour.html4++--
Msite/fresh_dill.html4++--
Msite/fresh_pesto_pasta.html4++--
Msite/fusilli.html4++--
Msite/garam_masala.html4++--
Msite/garlic.html4++--
Msite/garlic_powder.html4++--
Msite/ginger_root.html4++--
Msite/gluten_flour.html4++--
Msite/gochujang.html4++--
Msite/golden_beets.html4++--
Msite/granulated_sugar.html4++--
Msite/green_beans.html4++--
Msite/green_bell_peppers.html4++--
Msite/green_cabbage.html4++--
Msite/green_olives.html4++--
Msite/green_peas.html4++--
Msite/ground_turmeric.html4++--
Msite/hachiya_persimmon.html4++--
Msite/halloween_pumpkin_cookies.html4++--
Msite/heirloom_carrots.html4++--
Msite/home.html4++--
Msite/homemade_veganaise.html4++--
Msite/hop_ice_cream.html4++--
Msite/hops.html4++--
Msite/houjicha.html4++--
Msite/houjicha_overnight_oatmeal.html4++--
Msite/japanese_rice_vinegar.html4++--
Msite/kale.html4++--
Msite/kanten_powder.html4++--
Msite/kinako.html4++--
Msite/kiwi.html4++--
Msite/lemon.html4++--
Msite/lemon_juice.html4++--
Msite/lemon_zest.html4++--
Msite/lentils.html4++--
Msite/lentils_with_roasted_beet_sauce.html4++--
Msite/mango.html4++--
Msite/maple_syrup.html4++--
Msite/mason_jar_bread_pudding.html4++--
Msite/matcha_powder.html4++--
Msite/medium_grain_brown_rice.html4++--
Msite/mint.html4++--
Msite/mirin.html4++--
Msite/miso.html4++--
Msite/mushroom.html4++--
Msite/mushroom_zucchini_pasta.html4++--
Msite/mustard_from_seed.html4++--
Msite/mustard_seeds.html4++--
Msite/nagaimo.html4++--
Msite/no_knead_bread.html4++--
Msite/nori.html4++--
Msite/nori_sheets.html4++--
Msite/nutmeg.html4++--
Msite/nutrition.html4++--
Msite/nutritional_yeast.html4++--
Msite/oats.html4++--
Msite/okonomiyaki.html4++--
Msite/olive_oil.html4++--
Msite/olives.html4++--
Msite/onion.html4++--
Msite/onion_powder.html4++--
Msite/orange.html4++--
Msite/oregano.html4++--
Msite/pan_fried_breadfruit.html4++--
Msite/pandanus_fruit.html4++--
Msite/pandanus_fruit_bread.html4++--
Msite/panko.html4++--
Msite/panko_chickpea_fingers.html4++--
Msite/papaya.html4++--
Msite/papaya_bruschetta_topping.html4++--
Msite/paprika.html4++--
Msite/pate_chinois.html4++--
Msite/peanut_butter.html4++--
Msite/peanuts.html4++--
Msite/pears.html4++--
Msite/peppermint.html4++--
Msite/peppermint_oil.html4++--
Msite/peppers.html4++--
Msite/persian_cucumbers.html4++--
Msite/persimmon.html4++--
Msite/persimmon_curry.html4++--
Msite/pimento_olives.html4++--
Msite/pomegranate.html4++--
Msite/pomegranate_juice.html4++--
Msite/pomegranate_seeds.html4++--
Msite/poppy_seeds.html4++--
Msite/portobello.html4++--
Msite/potato_gnocchi.html4++--
Msite/potatoes.html4++--
Msite/powdered_sugar.html4++--
Msite/puffed_rice.html4++--
Msite/pumpkin.html4++--
Msite/pumpkin_seeds.html4++--
Msite/purple_cauliflower.html4++--
Msite/raisin_beet_bread.html4++--
Msite/red_beets.html4++--
Msite/red_bell_peppers.html4++--
Msite/red_cabbage.html4++--
Msite/red_miso.html4++--
Msite/red_onion.html4++--
Msite/red_wine.html4++--
Msite/rice.html4++--
Msite/rice_flour.html4++--
Msite/roasted_carrots_with_beluga_lentils.html4++--
Msite/roasted_pumpkin_seeds.html4++--
Msite/rolled_oats.html4++--
Msite/rosemary.html4++--
Msite/russet_potatoes.html4++--
Msite/sake.html4++--
Msite/salt.html4++--
Msite/salted_caramel_carob_chip_cookies.html4++--
Msite/savoury_turmeric_cookies.html4++--
Msite/scallions.html4++--
Msite/scrambled_chickpeas.html4++--
Msite/sea_salt.html4++--
Msite/seaweed.html4++--
Msite/seitan.html4++--
Msite/sesame_oil.html4++--
Msite/sesame_seeds.html4++--
Msite/shelled_hemp_seeds.html4++--
Msite/shichimi_togarashi.html4++--
Msite/shichimi_togarashi_crackers.html4++--
Msite/shiitake.html4++--
Msite/shimeji.html4++--
Msite/short_grain_white_rice.html4++--
Msite/sichuan_peppercorns.html4++--
Msite/small_heirloom_tomatoes.html4++--
Msite/smoked_paprika.html4++--
Msite/soft_tofu.html4++--
Msite/soy_beans.html4++--
Msite/soy_milk.html4++--
Msite/soy_sauce.html4++--
Msite/soy_yogurt.html4++--
Msite/spelt_flour.html4++--
Msite/spicy_stirfry_chickpeas.html4++--
Msite/spinach.html4++--
Msite/spinach_faux_cheese_ravioli.html4++--
Msite/spinach_oatmeal_cookies.html4++--
Msite/spinach_pajeon.html4++--
Msite/sriracha.html4++--
Msite/stovetop_popcorn.html4++--
Msite/sunflower_heirloom_carrot_pasta.html4++--
Msite/sunflower_seeds.html4++--
Msite/sweet_and_sour_lentils.html4++--
Msite/sweet_mock_eel_nigiri.html4++--
Msite/sweet_potatoes.html4++--
Msite/tahini.html4++--
Msite/tamarind_paste.html4++--
Msite/tempeh.html4++--
Msite/teriyaki_carrot_patties.html4++--
Msite/thyme.html4++--
Msite/tofu.html4++--
Msite/tomato_paste.html4++--
Msite/tools.html4++--
Msite/turmeric_root.html4++--
Msite/tzaziki.html4++--
Msite/uzumaki_hummus_bites.html4++--
Msite/vanilla.html4++--
Msite/vanilla_extract.html4++--
Msite/vegan_butter.html4++--
Msite/veganaise.html4++--
Msite/vegemite.html4++--
Msite/vegemite_caramel.html4++--
Msite/vegetable_bouillon.html4++--
Msite/veggie_pate.html4++--
Msite/wakame.html4++--
Msite/wakame_bites.html4++--
Msite/wasabi_powder.html4++--
Msite/wasabi_root.html4++--
Msite/wasabi_swirl_chocolate_cookies.html4++--
Msite/water.html4++--
Msite/wheat_semolina.html4++--
Msite/white_cauliflower.html4++--
Msite/white_miso.html4++--
Msite/white_sesame_seeds.html4++--
Msite/whole_cane_sugar.html4++--
Msite/whole_wheat_flour.html4++--
Msite/yellow_bell_peppers.html4++--
Msite/yellow_onion.html4++--
Msite/zucchini.html4++--
Msrc/builder.c2+-
302 files changed, 603 insertions(+), 603 deletions(-)

diff --git a/site/about.html b/site/about.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — About</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='about'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='about'><h1>About</h1><p>We started <b>Grimgrains</b> to teach ourselves how to cook. This blog, which now doubles as a travel diary, helps track our habits as we adapt to the localy available produce. All of these recipes are plant-based, and tree-nut free.</p><img src= '../media/pages/about/galley.jpg'/><p>We are <a href='http://kokorobot.ca/' class='external' target='_blank'>Rekka Bellum</a>(illustrator) and <a href='http://xxiivv.com' class='external' target='_blank'>Devine Lu Linvega</a>(developer), living on a small sailboat somewhere on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. <a href='http://100r.co' class='external' target='_blank'>Hundredrabbits</a> is the name of our floating studio, we write softwares and recipes as we sail around the world looking for new ingredients.</p><p>This website showcases our favourite creations, along with hand-drawn illustrations for each ingredient. The pages were generated entirely in the classic C99 programming language, and the sources can be found on <a href='https://github.com/hundredrabbits/Grimgrains' class='external' target='_blank'>Github</a>.</p><p>If you have any question, you can find us on on <a rel='me' href='https://merveilles.town/@rek'>Mastodon</a>.</p><img src= '../media/interface/toast.jpg' width='300'/><h3>Copyright policy</h3><p>You may adapt our recipes, but a link back or mention would be nice :).</p><p>The assets of grimgrains.com, unless stated otherwise, are <a href='http://100r.co/' class='external' target='_blank'>©hundredrabbits</a>. Photographs, drawings or text should not be used, published, reprinted or modified without our permission. The source code of the website is under the <a href='https://github.com/hundredrabbits/Grimgrains/blob/master/LICENSE' class='external' target='_blank'>MIT License</a>.</p><p>All recipes featured on grimgrains.com are our own, unless stated otherwise. The information is for food enthusiasts like ourselves, we do not claim to be all-knowing. Nor are we health professionals. Our views are our own, we encourage openness and curiosity whenever possible.</p><h3>Privacy statement</h3><p>We reserve the right to alter the blog at our own discretion. Words addressed to us in private will not be shared, nor will we use any of it in future publications.</p></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — About</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='about'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='about'><h1>About</h1><p>We started <b>Grimgrains</b> to teach ourselves how to cook. This blog, which now doubles as a travel diary, helps track our habits as we adapt to the localy available produce. All of these recipes are plant-based, and tree-nut free.</p><img src= '../media/pages/about/galley.jpg'/><p>We are <a href='http://kokorobot.ca/' class='external' target='_blank'>Rekka Bellum</a>(illustrator) and <a href='http://xxiivv.com' class='external' target='_blank'>Devine Lu Linvega</a>(developer), living on a small sailboat somewhere on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. <a href='http://100r.co' class='external' target='_blank'>Hundredrabbits</a> is the name of our floating studio, we write softwares and recipes as we sail around the world looking for new ingredients.</p><p>This website showcases our favourite creations, along with hand-drawn illustrations for each ingredient. The pages were generated entirely in the classic C99 programming language, and the sources can be found on <a href='https://github.com/hundredrabbits/Grimgrains' class='external' target='_blank'>Github</a>.</p><p>If you have any question, you can find us on on <a rel='me' href='https://merveilles.town/@rek'>Mastodon</a>.</p><img src= '../media/interface/toast.jpg' width='300'/><h3>Copyright policy</h3><p>You may adapt our recipes, but a link back or mention would be nice :).</p><p>The assets of grimgrains.com, unless stated otherwise, are <a href='http://100r.co/' class='external' target='_blank'>©hundredrabbits</a>. Photographs, drawings or text should not be used, published, reprinted or modified without our permission. The source code of the website is under the <a href='https://github.com/hundredrabbits/Grimgrains/blob/master/LICENSE' class='external' target='_blank'>MIT License</a>.</p><p>All recipes featured on grimgrains.com are our own, unless stated otherwise. The information is for food enthusiasts like ourselves, we do not claim to be all-knowing. Nor are we health professionals. Our views are our own, we encourage openness and curiosity whenever possible.</p><h3>Privacy statement</h3><p>We reserve the right to alter the blog at our own discretion. Words addressed to us in private will not be shared, nor will we use any of it in future publications.</p></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/acorn_squash.html b/site/acorn_squash.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — acorn squash</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>acorn squash</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/acorn_squash.png'/><p>Acorn squash is a winter squash, with skin a ridged outer skin and a sweet, yellow-orange flesh. Acorn squash comes in a variety of colors, like green, white and gold. They contain small amounts of <b>vitamin C</b>.<br /><br />Acorn squash can be baked, sauteed or steamed. When cooked, the flesh becomes tender and offers a mildly sweet and nutty flavor with a dry-ish texture. It is often used in savory recipes, stuffed with rice or vegetables. Adding <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> as a glaze when baking enhances the flavor of the squash. The seeds can be eaten, but must be roasted first. Acorn squash keep up to 1 month when stored uncut, in a cold and dry place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — acorn squash</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>acorn squash</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/acorn_squash.png'/><p>Acorn squash is a winter squash, with skin a ridged outer skin and a sweet, yellow-orange flesh. Acorn squash comes in a variety of colors, like green, white and gold. They contain small amounts of <b>vitamin C</b>.<br /><br />Acorn squash can be baked, sauteed or steamed. When cooked, the flesh becomes tender and offers a mildly sweet and nutty flavor with a dry-ish texture. It is often used in savory recipes, stuffed with rice or vegetables. Adding <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> as a glaze when baking enhances the flavor of the squash. The seeds can be eaten, but must be roasted first. Acorn squash keep up to 1 month when stored uncut, in a cold and dry place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/active_dry_yeast.html b/site/active_dry_yeast.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — active dry yeast</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>active dry yeast</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/active_dry_yeast.png'/><p>Yeast, the most common being <b>S. cerevisiae</b>, is used as a leavening agent in baking.<br /><br />Active dry yeast is sold in granulated form, it needs to be dissolved in warm water with sugar before use, unlike instant yeast which can be added right into dry ingredients. Yeast converts sugars into carbon dioxide, which in turn causes the dough to expand as the gas forms bubbles.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — active dry yeast</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>active dry yeast</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/active_dry_yeast.png'/><p>Yeast, the most common being <b>S. cerevisiae</b>, is used as a leavening agent in baking.<br /><br />Active dry yeast is sold in granulated form, it needs to be dissolved in warm water with sugar before use, unlike instant yeast which can be added right into dry ingredients. Yeast converts sugars into carbon dioxide, which in turn causes the dough to expand as the gas forms bubbles.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/agar_agar_powder.html b/site/agar_agar_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — agar agar powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>agar agar powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/agar_agar_powder.png'/><p>Agar-agar is a jelly-like substance that comes from red algea. It's used as a vegan substitute for gelatin, it is white, semi-translucent and sold in both dried strips or in powdered form. Agar agar is 80% fiber.<br /><br />Agar-agar is an allowed nonorganic/nonsynthetic additive used as a thickener, gelling agent, texturizer, moisturizer, emulsifier, flavor enhancer, and absorbent in certified organic foods (<a href='https://www.ams.usda.gov/?dDocName=STELPRDC5096516'>ref</a>).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — agar agar powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>agar agar powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/agar_agar_powder.png'/><p>Agar-agar is a jelly-like substance that comes from red algea. It's used as a vegan substitute for gelatin, it is white, semi-translucent and sold in both dried strips or in powdered form. Agar agar is 80% fiber.<br /><br />Agar-agar is an allowed nonorganic/nonsynthetic additive used as a thickener, gelling agent, texturizer, moisturizer, emulsifier, flavor enhancer, and absorbent in certified organic foods (<a href='https://www.ams.usda.gov/?dDocName=STELPRDC5096516'>ref</a>).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/alfalfa_sprouts.html b/site/alfalfa_sprouts.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — alfalfa sprouts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>alfalfa sprouts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/alfalfa_sprouts.png'/><p>Alfalfa sprouts, or <b>lucerne</b>, are soaked in water and allowed to <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20130515011922/http://coolshinystuff.com/how-to-sprout-alfalfa' target='_blank'>sprout</a> over several days. Sprouts have a crunchy texture with a sweet and nutty taste. They are a source of <b>vitamin C</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Alfalfa sprouts can be added to sandwiches, salads, or sprinkled atop dishes. Sprouting alfalfa usually takes three to four days with one tablespoon of seed yielding up to three full cups of sprouts. If you want to sprout seeds, make sure they are fresh and washed thoroughly with water before use. The FDA has made <a href='https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=FDA-2018-D-4534' target='_blank'>recommendations</a> for both growers and consumers on how to avoid contamination.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — alfalfa sprouts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>alfalfa sprouts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/alfalfa_sprouts.png'/><p>Alfalfa sprouts, or <b>lucerne</b>, are soaked in water and allowed to <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20130515011922/http://coolshinystuff.com/how-to-sprout-alfalfa' target='_blank'>sprout</a> over several days. Sprouts have a crunchy texture with a sweet and nutty taste. They are a source of <b>vitamin C</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Alfalfa sprouts can be added to sandwiches, salads, or sprinkled atop dishes. Sprouting alfalfa usually takes three to four days with one tablespoon of seed yielding up to three full cups of sprouts. If you want to sprout seeds, make sure they are fresh and washed thoroughly with water before use. The FDA has made <a href='https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=FDA-2018-D-4534' target='_blank'>recommendations</a> for both growers and consumers on how to avoid contamination.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/all_purpose_flour.html b/site/all_purpose_flour.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — all purpose flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>all purpose flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><p>All-purpose, or plain flour, has a medium level of gluten protein content. <br /><br />AP has enough protein content for many bread and pizza bases, although artisan bakers often use bread flour and special grade 00 Italian flours. "Plain" also refers to AP's lack of any added leavening agent.<br /><br /></p><h2>flour</h2><p class='small'>Flour is a powder made by grinding raw grains, roots, beans, nuts, or seeds. It is used to make many different foods. Cereal flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures. Wheat is the most common base for flour, as is corn flour and rye flour. Cereal flour consists either of the endosperm, germ, and bran together (<a href='wholegrain_wheat_flour.html'>wholegrain wheat flour</a>) or of the endosperm alone (<a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — all purpose flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>all purpose flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><p>All-purpose, or plain flour, has a medium level of gluten protein content. <br /><br />AP has enough protein content for many bread and pizza bases, although artisan bakers often use bread flour and special grade 00 Italian flours. "Plain" also refers to AP's lack of any added leavening agent.<br /><br /></p><h2>flour</h2><p class='small'>Flour is a powder made by grinding raw grains, roots, beans, nuts, or seeds. It is used to make many different foods. Cereal flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures. Wheat is the most common base for flour, as is corn flour and rye flour. Cereal flour consists either of the endosperm, germ, and bran together (<a href='wholegrain_wheat_flour.html'>wholegrain wheat flour</a>) or of the endosperm alone (<a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce.html b/site/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — anise bread with sweet pear sauce</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>anise bread with sweet pear sauce</h1><h2>2 mini loaves — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce.jpg'/><p class='col2'>It's mini loaf craze! Love baking with the mini silicone pans I bought, I've been making mini everything. This time, I made some anise bread topped with a sweet sauce, and loaded with caramelized pear chunks.<br /><br />My bag of anise seeds has been sitting in my pantry, for way too long, begging to be given a purpose.<img src='../media/recipes/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce_1.jpg'>The taste of anise pairs very well with pears.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>bread</h3><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='anise_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/anise_seeds.png'/><b>anise seeds</b> <u>1 tsp, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1/2 cup + 2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>325F</u>.</li><li>Put <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='ground_flax_seeds.html'>ground flax seeds</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, let thicken for <u>5 minutes</u> (this is your flax 'egg'). Mix in <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar.html'>sugar</a> and stir until dissolved. Add <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='ground_anise_seeds.html'>ground anise seeds</a>, and mix once more.</li><li>Add <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> to a bowl with <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a>. Mix.</li><li>Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ones, while gradually adding a bit over <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>.</li><li>Transfer evenly, to 2 mini loaf pans.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sauce</h3><dt><a href='bartlett_pear.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bartlett_pear.png'/><b>bartlett pear</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Cut your <a href='bartlett_pear.html'>bartlett pear</a> into cubes.</li><li>Heat a pan at medium to high heat, add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>. Once melted, add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar.html'>sugar</a> and <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>.</li><li>Once it starts to boil, add the cubed pear and lower the heat. Let it bathe in the sweet mixture for <u>3-5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the sauce over the 2 mini loaves, bake for <u>30 minutes</u>.</li><li>Let cool and serve!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — anise bread with sweet pear sauce</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>anise bread with sweet pear sauce</h1><h2>2 mini loaves — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce.jpg'/><p class='col2'>It's mini loaf craze! Love baking with the mini silicone pans I bought, I've been making mini everything. This time, I made some anise bread topped with a sweet sauce, and loaded with caramelized pear chunks.<br /><br />My bag of anise seeds has been sitting in my pantry, for way too long, begging to be given a purpose.<img src='../media/recipes/anise_bread_with_sweet_pear_sauce_1.jpg'>The taste of anise pairs very well with pears.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>bread</h3><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='anise_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/anise_seeds.png'/><b>anise seeds</b> <u>1 tsp, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1/2 cup + 2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>325F</u>.</li><li>Put <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='ground_flax_seeds.html'>ground flax seeds</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, let thicken for <u>5 minutes</u> (this is your flax 'egg'). Mix in <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar.html'>sugar</a> and stir until dissolved. Add <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='ground_anise_seeds.html'>ground anise seeds</a>, and mix once more.</li><li>Add <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> to a bowl with <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a>. Mix.</li><li>Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ones, while gradually adding a bit over <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>.</li><li>Transfer evenly, to 2 mini loaf pans.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sauce</h3><dt><a href='bartlett_pear.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bartlett_pear.png'/><b>bartlett pear</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Cut your <a href='bartlett_pear.html'>bartlett pear</a> into cubes.</li><li>Heat a pan at medium to high heat, add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>. Once melted, add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar.html'>sugar</a> and <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>.</li><li>Once it starts to boil, add the cubed pear and lower the heat. Let it bathe in the sweet mixture for <u>3-5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the sauce over the 2 mini loaves, bake for <u>30 minutes</u>.</li><li>Let cool and serve!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/anise_seeds.html b/site/anise_seeds.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — anise seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>anise seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/anise_seeds.png'/><p>Anise, also called aniseed or <b>Pimpinella</b>, is a spice with a flavor similar to star anise, fennel and liquorice. Anise is sweet and very aromatic. It's often used to flavor foods and drinks. The seeds, whole or ground, are used for preparation of teas and tisanes.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — anise seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>anise seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/anise_seeds.png'/><p>Anise, also called aniseed or <b>Pimpinella</b>, is a spice with a flavor similar to star anise, fennel and liquorice. Anise is sweet and very aromatic. It's often used to flavor foods and drinks. The seeds, whole or ground, are used for preparation of teas and tisanes.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/ao_nori.html b/site/ao_nori.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — ao nori</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>ao nori</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/ao_nori.png'/><p>Aonori <b>青海苔</b>, or green laver, is a type of edible green seaweed which includes species from the genus <b>Monostroma</b> and <b>Ulva</b>. It is referred to as aosa <b>アオサ</b> in some parts of Japan. The color of the aonori is intense, beautiful green. It has a distinctive fragrant green flavor. This type of seaweed is rich in <b>calcium</b> and is a moderate source of <b>iodine</b>.Aonori is sold dried, and is used in soups and tempura. It is also sprinkled atop a variety of Japanese dishes like yakisoba and <a href='#okonomiyaki.html'>okonomiyaki</a>.<br /><br /></p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — ao nori</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>ao nori</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/ao_nori.png'/><p>Aonori <b>青海苔</b>, or green laver, is a type of edible green seaweed which includes species from the genus <b>Monostroma</b> and <b>Ulva</b>. It is referred to as aosa <b>アオサ</b> in some parts of Japan. The color of the aonori is intense, beautiful green. It has a distinctive fragrant green flavor. This type of seaweed is rich in <b>calcium</b> and is a moderate source of <b>iodine</b>.Aonori is sold dried, and is used in soups and tempura. It is also sprinkled atop a variety of Japanese dishes like yakisoba and <a href='#okonomiyaki.html'>okonomiyaki</a>.<br /><br /></p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/apple.html b/site/apple.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apple</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apple</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apple.png'/><p>Apples is the fruit of the apple tree (Malus domestica). Different cultivars are bred for various uses, like cooking and cider production. Apples are low in essential nutrients.<br /><br />Apples can be canned, frozen and dried, it can also be processed into jam, vinegar, juice or alcohol. Some varieties of apple can be stored up to a year, other varieties (like granny smith and fuji) have 3x the storage life of other kinds.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apple</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apple</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apple.png'/><p>Apples is the fruit of the apple tree (Malus domestica). Different cultivars are bred for various uses, like cooking and cider production. Apples are low in essential nutrients.<br /><br />Apples can be canned, frozen and dried, it can also be processed into jam, vinegar, juice or alcohol. Some varieties of apple can be stored up to a year, other varieties (like granny smith and fuji) have 3x the storage life of other kinds.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/apple_cider_vinegar.html b/site/apple_cider_vinegar.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apple cider vinegar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apple cider vinegar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><p>Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apple juice, it is used for food preservation, marinades, vinaigrettes salad dressings. It has a sour taste, and can be used to make homemade cleaning products.<br /><br />ACV is made from crushing apples and extracting the juice, bacteria and yeast are then aded to kickstart the fermentation process which converts the sugars into alcohol. There is a second fermentation, which then turns the alcohol into vinegar by acetic acid-forming bacteria. It can be used as a leavening agent in recipes, when mixed with baking soda, creating a chemical reaction which produces carbon dioxide which helps lift the batter.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apple cider vinegar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apple cider vinegar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><p>Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apple juice, it is used for food preservation, marinades, vinaigrettes salad dressings. It has a sour taste, and can be used to make homemade cleaning products.<br /><br />ACV is made from crushing apples and extracting the juice, bacteria and yeast are then aded to kickstart the fermentation process which converts the sugars into alcohol. There is a second fermentation, which then turns the alcohol into vinegar by acetic acid-forming bacteria. It can be used as a leavening agent in recipes, when mixed with baking soda, creating a chemical reaction which produces carbon dioxide which helps lift the batter.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/apricot_jam.html b/site/apricot_jam.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apricot jam</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apricot jam</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apricot_jam.png'/><p>Apricot jam is made from the pureed flesh of the apricot fruit. It's easy to prepare, requiring only fresh apricots, <a href='sugar.html'>sugar</a> and <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a>. Apricots are a moderate source of <b>vitamin A</b> and <b>vitamin C</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — apricot jam</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>apricot jam</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/apricot_jam.png'/><p>Apricot jam is made from the pureed flesh of the apricot fruit. It's easy to prepare, requiring only fresh apricots, <a href='sugar.html'>sugar</a> and <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a>. Apricots are a moderate source of <b>vitamin A</b> and <b>vitamin C</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/arame.html b/site/arame.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arame</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arame</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arame.png'/><p>Arame, or <b> Eisenia bicyclis</b>, is a species of kelp (brown algae), and is very popular in Japanese cuisine. It is indigenous to the temperate Pacific Ocean waters around Japan. Arame has a mild, semi-sweet flavor and a firm texture, it is often sold dried. Dried arame can be reconstituted in water before consumption (for 5 min).<br /><br /></p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arame</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arame</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arame.png'/><p>Arame, or <b> Eisenia bicyclis</b>, is a species of kelp (brown algae), and is very popular in Japanese cuisine. It is indigenous to the temperate Pacific Ocean waters around Japan. Arame has a mild, semi-sweet flavor and a firm texture, it is often sold dried. Dried arame can be reconstituted in water before consumption (for 5 min).<br /><br /></p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/arame_soba.html b/site/arame_soba.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arame soba</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>arame soba</h1><h2>2 portions — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/arame_soba.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Montreal, QC. Canada<br /><br />After Japan opened itself to the world, Japanese cooks began to adapt western dishes in their own style. For instance in the west, people use ketchup as a condiment, but the Japanese use it as a base for tomato sauces. Spaghetti naporitan was created just after World War II, after Shigetada (the head chef at the Hotel New Grand in Yokohama) saw occupying soldiers eating it. Nowadays, you can find spaghetti seasoned with soy sauce, and served with seaweed.<br /><br /><b>About arame</b>: <a href='Arame.html'>Arame</a> is a species of kelp of a dark brown color, it has a mild, semi-sweet flavor and a firm texture. It can be reconstituted in about 5 minutes, and can be added to many kinds of dishes. It is high in calcium, iodine, iron, magnesium and vitamin A.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>main</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_noodles.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_noodles.png'/><b>buckwheat noodles</b> <u>2 portions</u></a></dt><dt><a href='arame.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/arame.png'/><b>arame</b> <u>handful</u></a></dt><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>2 cloves</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sichuan_peppercorns.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sichuan_peppercorns.png'/><b>sichuan peppercorns</b> <u>To taste</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>handful</i> of dried <a href='arame.html'>arame</a> in a bowl and cover with a cup of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Let re-hydrate for at least <u>5 minutes</u>, drain.</li><li>Bring a pot of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, add <i>2 portions</i> of soba(<a href='buckwheat_noodles.html'>buckwheat noodles</a>) and give them a quick stir so they go underwater. Reduce heat to medium and cook for <u>5 minutes</u>. Drain, rinse and transfer to a pot of cold water. Wash the noodles using your hands to remove the excess starch, drain and set aside.</li><li>Julienne <i>1</i> <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a>, chop <i>2 cloves</i> of <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a> and cut <i>60g</i> of <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> into small cubes. I used <b>noble bean</b> original tempeh.</li><li>Heat a pan with a drizzle of <a href='oil.html'>oil</a> at medium heat and sautee the <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a> for a minute until fragrant. Add the <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> as well as the julienned <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a> and cook for <u>2-3 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the sauce and cook for an additional <u>5 minutes</u> until the <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> and <a href='carrots.html'>carrots</a> are cooked.</li><li>Remove from heat and add the noodles, as well as the <a href='arame.html'>arame</a>. Stir well and divide into 2 plates, season with some <a href='sichuan_pepper.html'>sichuan pepper</a>.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arame soba</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>arame soba</h1><h2>2 portions — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/arame_soba.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Montreal, QC. Canada<br /><br />After Japan opened itself to the world, Japanese cooks began to adapt western dishes in their own style. For instance in the west, people use ketchup as a condiment, but the Japanese use it as a base for tomato sauces. Spaghetti naporitan was created just after World War II, after Shigetada (the head chef at the Hotel New Grand in Yokohama) saw occupying soldiers eating it. Nowadays, you can find spaghetti seasoned with soy sauce, and served with seaweed.<br /><br /><b>About arame</b>: <a href='Arame.html'>Arame</a> is a species of kelp of a dark brown color, it has a mild, semi-sweet flavor and a firm texture. It can be reconstituted in about 5 minutes, and can be added to many kinds of dishes. It is high in calcium, iodine, iron, magnesium and vitamin A.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>main</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_noodles.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_noodles.png'/><b>buckwheat noodles</b> <u>2 portions</u></a></dt><dt><a href='arame.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/arame.png'/><b>arame</b> <u>handful</u></a></dt><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>2 cloves</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sichuan_peppercorns.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sichuan_peppercorns.png'/><b>sichuan peppercorns</b> <u>To taste</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>handful</i> of dried <a href='arame.html'>arame</a> in a bowl and cover with a cup of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Let re-hydrate for at least <u>5 minutes</u>, drain.</li><li>Bring a pot of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, add <i>2 portions</i> of soba(<a href='buckwheat_noodles.html'>buckwheat noodles</a>) and give them a quick stir so they go underwater. Reduce heat to medium and cook for <u>5 minutes</u>. Drain, rinse and transfer to a pot of cold water. Wash the noodles using your hands to remove the excess starch, drain and set aside.</li><li>Julienne <i>1</i> <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a>, chop <i>2 cloves</i> of <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a> and cut <i>60g</i> of <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> into small cubes. I used <b>noble bean</b> original tempeh.</li><li>Heat a pan with a drizzle of <a href='oil.html'>oil</a> at medium heat and sautee the <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a> for a minute until fragrant. Add the <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> as well as the julienned <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a> and cook for <u>2-3 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the sauce and cook for an additional <u>5 minutes</u> until the <a href='tempeh.html'>tempeh</a> and <a href='carrots.html'>carrots</a> are cooked.</li><li>Remove from heat and add the noodles, as well as the <a href='arame.html'>arame</a>. Stir well and divide into 2 plates, season with some <a href='sichuan_pepper.html'>sichuan pepper</a>.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/arrowroot_starch.html b/site/arrowroot_starch.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arrowroot starch</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arrowroot starch</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arrowroot_starch.png'/><p>Arrowroot starch comes from the rhizomes of several tropical plants, traditionally from <b>Maranta arundinacea</b>, <b>Tacca leontopetaloides</b>, <b>Pueraria lobata</b> but also <b>Zamia integrifolia</b> and <b>Manihot esculenta</b>. Pure arrowroot is a light, white, odourless powder that swells into jelly when heated. It's used as a jelling agent, but also as a thickener for acidic foods. Unlike <a href='cornstarch'>cornstarch</a>, it doesn't go cloudy and thickens at lower temperatures.<br /><br />In recipes, 2 tsp of arrowroot can be substituted for 1 tbsp of cornstarch.< br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arrowroot starch</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arrowroot starch</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arrowroot_starch.png'/><p>Arrowroot starch comes from the rhizomes of several tropical plants, traditionally from <b>Maranta arundinacea</b>, <b>Tacca leontopetaloides</b>, <b>Pueraria lobata</b> but also <b>Zamia integrifolia</b> and <b>Manihot esculenta</b>. Pure arrowroot is a light, white, odourless powder that swells into jelly when heated. It's used as a jelling agent, but also as a thickener for acidic foods. Unlike <a href='cornstarch'>cornstarch</a>, it doesn't go cloudy and thickens at lower temperatures.<br /><br />In recipes, 2 tsp of arrowroot can be substituted for 1 tbsp of cornstarch.< br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/arugula.html b/site/arugula.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arugula</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arugula</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arugula.png'/><p>Arugula, or <b>rocket</b>, is a plant grown for its leaves, which are fresh, taste and bitter. Arugula is rich in <b>vitamin C</b>. Arugula is good in salads, it is used both raw and cooked, though cooking it results in a muted flavor. Add this herb onto pizza, pasta, or to sandwiches. The sharp flavor of arugular pairs well with citrus, roasted beets, olives etc (<a href='http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/arugula_301.php'>ref</a>). Its flowers, young seed pods and mature seeds are also edible.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — arugula</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>arugula</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/arugula.png'/><p>Arugula, or <b>rocket</b>, is a plant grown for its leaves, which are fresh, taste and bitter. Arugula is rich in <b>vitamin C</b>. Arugula is good in salads, it is used both raw and cooked, though cooking it results in a muted flavor. Add this herb onto pizza, pasta, or to sandwiches. The sharp flavor of arugular pairs well with citrus, roasted beets, olives etc (<a href='http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/arugula_301.php'>ref</a>). Its flowers, young seed pods and mature seeds are also edible.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/avocado.html b/site/avocado.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — avocado</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>avocado</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/avocado.png'/><p>Avocados are botanically 'berries', they may be pear-shaped, round or egg-shaped. They are a good source of <b>vitamin C</b>, 75 percent of its energy comes from fat. Its flesh is thick, yellow/green and oily. It has a rich, creamy flavor with a nutty, yet clean, grassy finish.<br /><br />Avocado can be pureed, spooned out its shell and eaten as is (when ripe), or added to salads. The flesh is prone to enzymatic browning, quickly turning brown after exposure to air. To prevent browning, add lime or lemon juice to avocados after peeling.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — avocado</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>avocado</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/avocado.png'/><p>Avocados are botanically 'berries', they may be pear-shaped, round or egg-shaped. They are a good source of <b>vitamin C</b>, 75 percent of its energy comes from fat. Its flesh is thick, yellow/green and oily. It has a rich, creamy flavor with a nutty, yet clean, grassy finish.<br /><br />Avocado can be pureed, spooned out its shell and eaten as is (when ripe), or added to salads. The flesh is prone to enzymatic browning, quickly turning brown after exposure to air. To prevent browning, add lime or lemon juice to avocados after peeling.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/baguette.html b/site/baguette.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baguette</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baguette</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baguette.png'/><p>Originating in France, baguettes are made from basic lean dough. It is recognizable by its length and crisp crust. The supposed history of baguettes is an interesting one. A law in the 1920's was put in place to keep bakers from working before 4 am, this didn't give them time to make proper rounded loaves. Making slender baguettes was a simple solution to this problem since they bake more rapidly.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baguette</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baguette</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baguette.png'/><p>Originating in France, baguettes are made from basic lean dough. It is recognizable by its length and crisp crust. The supposed history of baguettes is an interesting one. A law in the 1920's was put in place to keep bakers from working before 4 am, this didn't give them time to make proper rounded loaves. Making slender baguettes was a simple solution to this problem since they bake more rapidly.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/baking_powder.html b/site/baking_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baking powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baking powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><p>Baking soda is a chemical leavening agent made from a combination of a carbonate or bicarbonate and a weak acid. The acid doesn't react prematurely to the carbonate due to the added <a href='cornstarch.html'>cornstarch</a>. Baking powder helps give rise and volume to baked goods by releasing carbon dioxide gas into the batter by way of an acid-base reaction. There are two types: single and double-acting. Double acting acid reacts in a wet mixture with baking soda at room temperature, while slow-acting only reacts when heated.<br /><br /> Baking powder is used instead of yeast in some recipes to avoid fermentation flavors, and to speed the production of baked goods (as carbon dioxide gas is released quicker with an acid-base reaction). Generally, 1 tsp of baking powder is used to raise a mix of 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of liquid. If the recipe is acidic (lemon juice, citrus, buttermilk etc) some of the baking powder should be replaced with baking soda, for example: 1 cup flour + 1 cup buttermilk requires 1/2 tsp of baking powder and 1/4 tsp of baking soda.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baking powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baking powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><p>Baking soda is a chemical leavening agent made from a combination of a carbonate or bicarbonate and a weak acid. The acid doesn't react prematurely to the carbonate due to the added <a href='cornstarch.html'>cornstarch</a>. Baking powder helps give rise and volume to baked goods by releasing carbon dioxide gas into the batter by way of an acid-base reaction. There are two types: single and double-acting. Double acting acid reacts in a wet mixture with baking soda at room temperature, while slow-acting only reacts when heated.<br /><br /> Baking powder is used instead of yeast in some recipes to avoid fermentation flavors, and to speed the production of baked goods (as carbon dioxide gas is released quicker with an acid-base reaction). Generally, 1 tsp of baking powder is used to raise a mix of 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of liquid. If the recipe is acidic (lemon juice, citrus, buttermilk etc) some of the baking powder should be replaced with baking soda, for example: 1 cup flour + 1 cup buttermilk requires 1/2 tsp of baking powder and 1/4 tsp of baking soda.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/baking_soda.html b/site/baking_soda.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baking soda</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baking soda</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><p>Sodium bicarbonate, also known as <b>baking soda</b>, is a chemical compound, a salt composed of a sodium cation (Na+) and a bicarbonate anion (HCO3−). It's a white solid that is crystalline but that often appears as a fine powder. It has a salty, alkaline taste. In cooking, it's used as a leavening agent.<br /><br /> When baking soda reacts with an acid, carbon dioxide is released which causes the expansion of baked goods. Acids that create this reactions include of tartar, <a href='lemon_juice_'>lemon juice</a>, buttermilk (plant milk + acid), cocoa and vinegar.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — baking soda</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>baking soda</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><p>Sodium bicarbonate, also known as <b>baking soda</b>, is a chemical compound, a salt composed of a sodium cation (Na+) and a bicarbonate anion (HCO3−). It's a white solid that is crystalline but that often appears as a fine powder. It has a salty, alkaline taste. In cooking, it's used as a leavening agent.<br /><br /> When baking soda reacts with an acid, carbon dioxide is released which causes the expansion of baked goods. Acids that create this reactions include of tartar, <a href='lemon_juice_'>lemon juice</a>, buttermilk (plant milk + acid), cocoa and vinegar.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/balsamic_banana_ice_cream.html b/site/balsamic_banana_ice_cream.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — balsamic banana ice cream</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>balsamic banana ice cream</h1><h2>2 servings — 120 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/balsamic_banana_ice_cream.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Banana ice cream is a simple alternative to dairy or coconut based desserts. It's a no-fuss recipe, that requires little preparation and waiting time.<br /><br />Making it is easy, and only requires putting bananas in the freezer. While waiting for them to harden up, prepare your balsamic coulis. If you've ever boiled balsamic vinegar, you know that it can sting your eyes. Making a balsamic vinegar reduction makes it thick and syrupy, and works well as a topping. I like the contrast of the bananas and vinegar.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>balsamic reduction</h3><dt><a href='balsamic_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/balsamic_vinegar.png'/><b>balsamic vinegar</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='balsamic_vinegar.html'>balsamic vinegar</a> in a non-stick pan.</li><li>Bring up to medium high heat, once it starts to boil bring down to medium low and let simmer until the vinegar has been reduced by a little more than half. Stir it on occasion. Make sure you have an open window or the overhead fan running because boiling vinegar has a really strong smell!</li><li>Transfer to a bowl and let cool completely, then store in the refrigerator. It will thicken when it gets cold. This recipe makes a lot of balsamic reduction, it's hard to make very little. It keeps in the refrigerator for a while so you can easily use it in other recipes. It's great when served over fruit.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>banana ice cream</h3><dt><a href='banana.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/banana.png'/><b>banana</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Peel and cut <i>2 whole</i> <a href='bananas.html'>bananas</a> into slices, lay slices flat onto a plate and put in the freezer for at least <u>2 hours</u>.</li><li>When properly frozen, put the banana slices in a blender — or food processor — with <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a>. Process until smooth.</li><li>Serve in individual bowls, with <i>1 tsp</i> or more of balsamic reduction.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — balsamic banana ice cream</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>balsamic banana ice cream</h1><h2>2 servings — 120 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/balsamic_banana_ice_cream.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Banana ice cream is a simple alternative to dairy or coconut based desserts. It's a no-fuss recipe, that requires little preparation and waiting time.<br /><br />Making it is easy, and only requires putting bananas in the freezer. While waiting for them to harden up, prepare your balsamic coulis. If you've ever boiled balsamic vinegar, you know that it can sting your eyes. Making a balsamic vinegar reduction makes it thick and syrupy, and works well as a topping. I like the contrast of the bananas and vinegar.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>balsamic reduction</h3><dt><a href='balsamic_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/balsamic_vinegar.png'/><b>balsamic vinegar</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='balsamic_vinegar.html'>balsamic vinegar</a> in a non-stick pan.</li><li>Bring up to medium high heat, once it starts to boil bring down to medium low and let simmer until the vinegar has been reduced by a little more than half. Stir it on occasion. Make sure you have an open window or the overhead fan running because boiling vinegar has a really strong smell!</li><li>Transfer to a bowl and let cool completely, then store in the refrigerator. It will thicken when it gets cold. This recipe makes a lot of balsamic reduction, it's hard to make very little. It keeps in the refrigerator for a while so you can easily use it in other recipes. It's great when served over fruit.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>banana ice cream</h3><dt><a href='banana.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/banana.png'/><b>banana</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Peel and cut <i>2 whole</i> <a href='bananas.html'>bananas</a> into slices, lay slices flat onto a plate and put in the freezer for at least <u>2 hours</u>.</li><li>When properly frozen, put the banana slices in a blender — or food processor — with <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a>. Process until smooth.</li><li>Serve in individual bowls, with <i>1 tsp</i> or more of balsamic reduction.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/balsamic_vinegar.html b/site/balsamic_vinegar.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — balsamic vinegar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>balsamic vinegar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/balsamic_vinegar.png'/><p>Balsamic vinegar, or <b>aceto balsamico</b> is a dark, concentrated, flavoured vinegar from Italy. It is made wholly, or in part from grape must. True balsamic vinegar is rich with a complex flavor that is both sweet and sour. The name "aceto balsamico" isn't regulated, but there are 3 in existence that are: Aceto Balsamic Tradizionale di Modena, Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia and Aceto Balsamico di Modena. The two traditional varieties are made from a reduction of pressed Trebbiano and Lambrusco grapes that are aged for many years in wooden barrels (for a minimum of 12yrs), produced exclusively in the province of Modena or the Emilia region around it. Aceto Balsamico di Modena is also made from grape must, but it is blended with wine vinegar, and imitates the traditional product.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — balsamic vinegar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>balsamic vinegar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/balsamic_vinegar.png'/><p>Balsamic vinegar, or <b>aceto balsamico</b> is a dark, concentrated, flavoured vinegar from Italy. It is made wholly, or in part from grape must. True balsamic vinegar is rich with a complex flavor that is both sweet and sour. The name "aceto balsamico" isn't regulated, but there are 3 in existence that are: Aceto Balsamic Tradizionale di Modena, Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia and Aceto Balsamico di Modena. The two traditional varieties are made from a reduction of pressed Trebbiano and Lambrusco grapes that are aged for many years in wooden barrels (for a minimum of 12yrs), produced exclusively in the province of Modena or the Emilia region around it. Aceto Balsamico di Modena is also made from grape must, but it is blended with wine vinegar, and imitates the traditional product.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bamboo_charcoal_powder.html b/site/bamboo_charcoal_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bamboo charcoal powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bamboo charcoal powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><p>Bamboo charcoal comes from pieces of bamboo plants, harvested after at least five years, and burned in ovens at temperatures ranging from <u>800 °C</u> to <u>1200 °C</u>.<br /><br />It is an environmentally functional material featuring excellent absorption properties. It eliminates organic impurities and smells, and can be added to foods to give them a black tint.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bamboo charcoal powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bamboo charcoal powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><p>Bamboo charcoal comes from pieces of bamboo plants, harvested after at least five years, and burned in ovens at temperatures ranging from <u>800 °C</u> to <u>1200 °C</u>.<br /><br />It is an environmentally functional material featuring excellent absorption properties. It eliminates organic impurities and smells, and can be added to foods to give them a black tint.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/banana.html b/site/banana.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — banana</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>banana</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/banana.png'/><p>They can be used in a variety of ways in recipes, for both desserts and savoury meals. They can be deep fried, baked in their skin, steamed, made into preserves, processed into vinegar etc.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — banana</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>banana</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/banana.png'/><p>They can be used in a variety of ways in recipes, for both desserts and savoury meals. They can be deep fried, baked in their skin, steamed, made into preserves, processed into vinegar etc.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bartlett_pear.html b/site/bartlett_pear.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bartlett pear</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bartlett pear</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bartlett_pear.png'/><p>Barlett pears are large, and have a skin that brightens as it ripens, transforming it from a green to a golden yellow tint. They have a cream-colored flesh, that is crunchy and tart when ripe, and a buttery and sweet taste when fully ripe. They are rich in <b>vitamin C</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Bartlett pears can be eaten raw, they can be baked, boiled and grilled. Bartlett pears are known as the “canning pear” because they hold their shape and have a distinct flavor and sweetness when preserved.<br /><br /></p><h2>pears</h2><p class='small'>Pears are the fruit of the pear tree, a species of genus <b>Pyrus</b>. Most pears are cold-hardy, withstanding temperatures between -25C and -30C in winter. There are many species of pears, ranging in size, shape and color. They will keep up to 3 weeks when stored in the refrigerator and a little over 1 year if frozen. Pears ripen at room temperature. They will ripen faster if placed next to bananas in a fruit bowl.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bartlett pear</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bartlett pear</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bartlett_pear.png'/><p>Barlett pears are large, and have a skin that brightens as it ripens, transforming it from a green to a golden yellow tint. They have a cream-colored flesh, that is crunchy and tart when ripe, and a buttery and sweet taste when fully ripe. They are rich in <b>vitamin C</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Bartlett pears can be eaten raw, they can be baked, boiled and grilled. Bartlett pears are known as the “canning pear” because they hold their shape and have a distinct flavor and sweetness when preserved.<br /><br /></p><h2>pears</h2><p class='small'>Pears are the fruit of the pear tree, a species of genus <b>Pyrus</b>. Most pears are cold-hardy, withstanding temperatures between -25C and -30C in winter. There are many species of pears, ranging in size, shape and color. They will keep up to 3 weeks when stored in the refrigerator and a little over 1 year if frozen. Pears ripen at room temperature. They will ripen faster if placed next to bananas in a fruit bowl.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/basic_black_bread.html b/site/basic_black_bread.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basic black bread</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>basic black bread</h1><h2>1 loaf — 140 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Introducing, my basic black bread recipe. This bread is super light and fluffy, it's great great for morning toast or sandwiches.<br /><br />I've been reading up a lot about bread, there's so many kinds out there. I wanted to understand how the ingredients we add, can change the texture of the bread. Also read about the differences in temperature, to knead or not to knead etc.<br /><br />Truth is, it depends on the type of bread you want.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread_1.jpg'/><br /><br />I wanted to make a sandwich bread with a light crumb, the kind that bounces back when touched.<br /><br />The one I made this time has more fat, which in turn makes it softer and fluffier. The fat that you use will also change the texture/taste of the bread. A lot of people wont like the idea of adding 'fat' to a recipe, know that fat isn't synonymous with unhealthy. Too much of it can be bad, but in moderation there really isn't anything to worry about. It also depends on what fat you choose, there are good and bad kinds of fat.<br /><br />There are many things you can do to help soften your bread, like brushing the outside with a little oil or fat. Do this as soon as you take it out of the oven, it will make the outside less crunchy. You can also substitute nut milk for the water, if you want a richer taste. There are so many different things to think about when baking!<br /><br />I made this loaf for a brunch I had with friends, we wanted to have fondue with a set I got as a gift during the holidays. We cut the loaf into cubes, and dunked them in! Soft bread is perfect for fondue!<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread_2.jpg'/><br /><br />So there you have it! A basic black bread!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>bread</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_wheat_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_wheat_flour.png'/><b>whole wheat flour</b> <u>1 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><b>bamboo charcoal powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup, warm</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='active_dry_yeast.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/active_dry_yeast.png'/><b>active dry yeast</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1 1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>3/4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>white sesame seeds</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='corn_semolina.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><b>corn semolina</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coconut_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><b>coconut oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a large bowl, stir <i>1 1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> and <i>3/4 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> in <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='warm_water.html'>warm water</a> until dissolved. Sprinkle tsp of <a href='active_dry_yeast.html'>active dry yeast</a>, let sit for <u>10 minutes</u>.</li><li>Sift <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>, <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='whole_grain_flour.html'>whole grain flour</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'>bamboo charcoal powder</a> together in a separate bowl. Once flours are mixed evenly enough.</li><li>Add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> to the water mix, then stir in <i>1/2 cup</i> of the flour mix with a wooden spoon. Keep adding flour a <u>1/2 cup</u> at a time, until the dough stops sticking to the sides.</li><li>Put ball of dough on lightly floured counter-top and start kneading, add a bit of flour everytime it starts to stick to your hands. Knead for <u>15 minutes</u>. You may not use up all of your flour, if there's still a lot left and your dough is nice smooth don't add any more. Don't want to risk drying it out.</li><li>Heat up oven at the very lowest setting. This will be our warm place for bread rising.</li><li>Grease up a bowl and put the dough, rolling it once to cover all sides. Cover with a cloth and place in oven. <i>Let rise for 45 minutes</i>.</li><li>Your bread should have doubled in size. Take bread out of oven, knead a few times and shape into a 10-11 inch cigar-shape. Sprinkle some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> on a baking sheet and place bread on top - this will keep it from sticking. Slash the top of the bread in the middle with a knife, doing this will keep the ends of the bread from splitting. Mist top of bread lightly with <a href='water.html'>water</a>, then add <a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'>white sesame seeds</a>. Press lightly to make them stick. Cover loaf with a cloth, put back in oven to rise for an additional <u>45 minutes</u>. If you don't want a traditional bread shape, put bread in a greased loaf pan to rise.</li><li>Turn oven up to <u>350F</u> . Bake for <a href='30_minutes.html'>30 minutes</a>, or until it sounds hollow when tapped at the bottom.</li><li>Brush sides lightly with <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>, then let cool on a pile of towels or a cooling rack if you have one.</li><li>BURGER BUNS: Repeat steps 1 to 6.</li><li>Instead of forming into a 'cigar' shape at step 7, <i>divide into 8 pieces</i> and shape into a tight ball. Sprinkle baking sheet with some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> and put buns on top. Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes in the warmed oven.</li><li>Take buns out of oven, brush lightly with <a href='vegan_butter.html'>vegan butter</a> and put <a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'>white sesame seeds</a> on top. Bake uncovered for <u>20 minutes</u> at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a pile of towels or cooling rack.</li><li>HOT DOG BUNS: Repeat steps 1 to 6. <i>Divide through into 15 pieces</i> and shape into small cylinders (or general elongated hot dog shape). Sprinkle baking sheet with some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> and put buns on top. Cover and let rise for another <u>45 minutes</u> in the warmed oven.</li><li>Take buns out of oven, brush lightly with <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>. Bake uncovered for <u>20 minutes</u> at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a pile of towels or cooling rack.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basic black bread</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>basic black bread</h1><h2>1 loaf — 140 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Introducing, my basic black bread recipe. This bread is super light and fluffy, it's great great for morning toast or sandwiches.<br /><br />I've been reading up a lot about bread, there's so many kinds out there. I wanted to understand how the ingredients we add, can change the texture of the bread. Also read about the differences in temperature, to knead or not to knead etc.<br /><br />Truth is, it depends on the type of bread you want.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread_1.jpg'/><br /><br />I wanted to make a sandwich bread with a light crumb, the kind that bounces back when touched.<br /><br />The one I made this time has more fat, which in turn makes it softer and fluffier. The fat that you use will also change the texture/taste of the bread. A lot of people wont like the idea of adding 'fat' to a recipe, know that fat isn't synonymous with unhealthy. Too much of it can be bad, but in moderation there really isn't anything to worry about. It also depends on what fat you choose, there are good and bad kinds of fat.<br /><br />There are many things you can do to help soften your bread, like brushing the outside with a little oil or fat. Do this as soon as you take it out of the oven, it will make the outside less crunchy. You can also substitute nut milk for the water, if you want a richer taste. There are so many different things to think about when baking!<br /><br />I made this loaf for a brunch I had with friends, we wanted to have fondue with a set I got as a gift during the holidays. We cut the loaf into cubes, and dunked them in! Soft bread is perfect for fondue!<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/basic_black_bread_2.jpg'/><br /><br />So there you have it! A basic black bread!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>bread</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_wheat_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_wheat_flour.png'/><b>whole wheat flour</b> <u>1 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><b>bamboo charcoal powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup, warm</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='active_dry_yeast.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/active_dry_yeast.png'/><b>active dry yeast</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1 1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>3/4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>white sesame seeds</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='corn_semolina.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><b>corn semolina</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coconut_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><b>coconut oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a large bowl, stir <i>1 1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> and <i>3/4 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> in <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='warm_water.html'>warm water</a> until dissolved. Sprinkle tsp of <a href='active_dry_yeast.html'>active dry yeast</a>, let sit for <u>10 minutes</u>.</li><li>Sift <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>, <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='whole_grain_flour.html'>whole grain flour</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'>bamboo charcoal powder</a> together in a separate bowl. Once flours are mixed evenly enough.</li><li>Add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> to the water mix, then stir in <i>1/2 cup</i> of the flour mix with a wooden spoon. Keep adding flour a <u>1/2 cup</u> at a time, until the dough stops sticking to the sides.</li><li>Put ball of dough on lightly floured counter-top and start kneading, add a bit of flour everytime it starts to stick to your hands. Knead for <u>15 minutes</u>. You may not use up all of your flour, if there's still a lot left and your dough is nice smooth don't add any more. Don't want to risk drying it out.</li><li>Heat up oven at the very lowest setting. This will be our warm place for bread rising.</li><li>Grease up a bowl and put the dough, rolling it once to cover all sides. Cover with a cloth and place in oven. <i>Let rise for 45 minutes</i>.</li><li>Your bread should have doubled in size. Take bread out of oven, knead a few times and shape into a 10-11 inch cigar-shape. Sprinkle some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> on a baking sheet and place bread on top - this will keep it from sticking. Slash the top of the bread in the middle with a knife, doing this will keep the ends of the bread from splitting. Mist top of bread lightly with <a href='water.html'>water</a>, then add <a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'>white sesame seeds</a>. Press lightly to make them stick. Cover loaf with a cloth, put back in oven to rise for an additional <u>45 minutes</u>. If you don't want a traditional bread shape, put bread in a greased loaf pan to rise.</li><li>Turn oven up to <u>350F</u> . Bake for <a href='30_minutes.html'>30 minutes</a>, or until it sounds hollow when tapped at the bottom.</li><li>Brush sides lightly with <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>, then let cool on a pile of towels or a cooling rack if you have one.</li><li>BURGER BUNS: Repeat steps 1 to 6.</li><li>Instead of forming into a 'cigar' shape at step 7, <i>divide into 8 pieces</i> and shape into a tight ball. Sprinkle baking sheet with some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> and put buns on top. Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes in the warmed oven.</li><li>Take buns out of oven, brush lightly with <a href='vegan_butter.html'>vegan butter</a> and put <a href='white_sesame_seeds.html'>white sesame seeds</a> on top. Bake uncovered for <u>20 minutes</u> at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a pile of towels or cooling rack.</li><li>HOT DOG BUNS: Repeat steps 1 to 6. <i>Divide through into 15 pieces</i> and shape into small cylinders (or general elongated hot dog shape). Sprinkle baking sheet with some <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> and put buns on top. Cover and let rise for another <u>45 minutes</u> in the warmed oven.</li><li>Take buns out of oven, brush lightly with <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>. Bake uncovered for <u>20 minutes</u> at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a pile of towels or cooling rack.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/basic_toothpaste.html b/site/basic_toothpaste.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basic toothpaste</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>basic toothpaste</h1><h2>1 jar — 5 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/basic_toothpaste.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I've always liked making things from scratch, especially when cooking. I enjoy the process. Making it myself means that I control the quality and quantity of each ingredient. In the last couple of years, I've removed most pre-made cleaning and hygiene products from my life. I make my own shampoo, deodorant, toilet cleaner, kitchen cleaner, and I also make my own toothpaste.<br /><br />Chances are you already have all of the ingredients at home to make it. The recipe consists of <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a>, <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a> and <a href='peppermint_oil.html'>peppermint oil</a> (also food grade).<br /><br />You can also brush your teeth with a simple baking soda and water paste. Baking soda is abrasive enough to remove accumulations on teeth and rinses completely clear with only a very slightly salty taste. For those who dislike brushing with a salty taste, adding coconut and peppermint oil helps to smooth down both the taste and texture.<br /><br /><b>NOTE</b>: In colder climates your toothpaste will solidify and scraping some onto your toothbrush can be a challenge. Put the jar near a heater for 5 minutes or so to help soften it down.<br /><br />Toothpaste is only as good as your brushing (which should last for a min of 2min). It is more important to brush your teeth thoroughly than to use toothpaste, especially after eating sweets.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>toothpaste</h3><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1 1/2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coconut_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><b>coconut oil</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='peppermint_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/peppermint_oil.png'/><b>peppermint oil</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>1 1/2 tbsp</i> of <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>. If the coconut oil is hard, melt it down and mix it with the dry ingredients</li><li>Add <i>1/2 tsp</i> of food grade <a href='peppermint_oil.html'>peppermint oil</a>.</li><li>Mix everything up and brush your teeth!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basic toothpaste</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>basic toothpaste</h1><h2>1 jar — 5 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/basic_toothpaste.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I've always liked making things from scratch, especially when cooking. I enjoy the process. Making it myself means that I control the quality and quantity of each ingredient. In the last couple of years, I've removed most pre-made cleaning and hygiene products from my life. I make my own shampoo, deodorant, toilet cleaner, kitchen cleaner, and I also make my own toothpaste.<br /><br />Chances are you already have all of the ingredients at home to make it. The recipe consists of <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a>, <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a> and <a href='peppermint_oil.html'>peppermint oil</a> (also food grade).<br /><br />You can also brush your teeth with a simple baking soda and water paste. Baking soda is abrasive enough to remove accumulations on teeth and rinses completely clear with only a very slightly salty taste. For those who dislike brushing with a salty taste, adding coconut and peppermint oil helps to smooth down both the taste and texture.<br /><br /><b>NOTE</b>: In colder climates your toothpaste will solidify and scraping some onto your toothbrush can be a challenge. Put the jar near a heater for 5 minutes or so to help soften it down.<br /><br />Toothpaste is only as good as your brushing (which should last for a min of 2min). It is more important to brush your teeth thoroughly than to use toothpaste, especially after eating sweets.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>toothpaste</h3><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1 1/2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coconut_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><b>coconut oil</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='peppermint_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/peppermint_oil.png'/><b>peppermint oil</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>1 1/2 tbsp</i> of <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='coconut_oil.html'>coconut oil</a>. If the coconut oil is hard, melt it down and mix it with the dry ingredients</li><li>Add <i>1/2 tsp</i> of food grade <a href='peppermint_oil.html'>peppermint oil</a>.</li><li>Mix everything up and brush your teeth!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/basil.html b/site/basil.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>basil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/basil.png'/><p>Basil, or <b>Ocimum basilicum</b> is an aromatic plant, with a wide range of fragrances (depending on the variety). The leaves may taste like anise, with a strong smell. The most common type is sweet basil, but there is also thai basil, lemon basil and holy basil.<br /><br />In cooking, add it at the last moment, as cooking quickly destroys the flavor. Fresh basil can be used whole, chopped, made into a paste or dried. Basil will keep if dry and refrigerated, but should be used up within a week. When soaked in water, the seeds of several basil varieties become gelatinous.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>basil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/basil.png'/><p>Basil, or <b>Ocimum basilicum</b> is an aromatic plant, with a wide range of fragrances (depending on the variety). The leaves may taste like anise, with a strong smell. The most common type is sweet basil, but there is also thai basil, lemon basil and holy basil.<br /><br />In cooking, add it at the last moment, as cooking quickly destroys the flavor. Fresh basil can be used whole, chopped, made into a paste or dried. Basil will keep if dry and refrigerated, but should be used up within a week. When soaked in water, the seeds of several basil varieties become gelatinous.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/basmati_rice.html b/site/basmati_rice.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basmati rice</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>basmati rice</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/basmati_rice.png'/><p>Basmati, meaning <b>fragrant</b>, is a variety of long, thin-grained aromatic rice traditionally cultivated in India. The rice has a <a href='#pandanus.html'>pandan</a>-like flavor, giving it a spicy fragrance. The level of the compound that gives basmati rice its distinctive aroma decreases in cooking, but if the rice is soaked 30 min before cooking it helps preserve more of it.<br /><br /><b>How to cook:</b> Ratios of rice to water is 1:1.5 To cook basmati rice, rinse for a few minutes to get rid of the starch that makes the rice sticky. Add a bit of salt to the rice into the rice grains. Pour boiling water over the rice. Set pot over med-high heat, when water boils cover with lid so that no steam escapes. Reduce heat, cook for 15 min. After 15 min, remove from heat and let rest for another 5 min.<br /><br /></p><h2>rice</h2><p class='small'>Rice is the seed of the grass species <b>Oryza sativa</b> (asian rice) or <b>Oryza glaberrima</b> (african rice). Rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans. Many varieties of rice are fortified to reduce malnutrition.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — basmati rice</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>basmati rice</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/basmati_rice.png'/><p>Basmati, meaning <b>fragrant</b>, is a variety of long, thin-grained aromatic rice traditionally cultivated in India. The rice has a <a href='#pandanus.html'>pandan</a>-like flavor, giving it a spicy fragrance. The level of the compound that gives basmati rice its distinctive aroma decreases in cooking, but if the rice is soaked 30 min before cooking it helps preserve more of it.<br /><br /><b>How to cook:</b> Ratios of rice to water is 1:1.5 To cook basmati rice, rinse for a few minutes to get rid of the starch that makes the rice sticky. Add a bit of salt to the rice into the rice grains. Pour boiling water over the rice. Set pot over med-high heat, when water boils cover with lid so that no steam escapes. Reduce heat, cook for 15 min. After 15 min, remove from heat and let rest for another 5 min.<br /><br /></p><h2>rice</h2><p class='small'>Rice is the seed of the grass species <b>Oryza sativa</b> (asian rice) or <b>Oryza glaberrima</b> (african rice). Rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans. Many varieties of rice are fortified to reduce malnutrition.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bay_leaf.html b/site/bay_leaf.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bay leaf</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bay leaf</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bay_leaf.png'/><p>The bay leaf is an aromatic leaf that is both used whole, dried and ground. Bay leaf come from many plants, like the Bay laurel <b>Laurus nobilis</b>, California bay leaf <b>Umbellularia californica</b> and Malabathrum <b>Cinnamomum tamala</b>. Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavour and fragrance.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bay leaf</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bay leaf</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bay_leaf.png'/><p>The bay leaf is an aromatic leaf that is both used whole, dried and ground. Bay leaf come from many plants, like the Bay laurel <b>Laurus nobilis</b>, California bay leaf <b>Umbellularia californica</b> and Malabathrum <b>Cinnamomum tamala</b>. Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavour and fragrance.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beans.html b/site/beans.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beans</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beans</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beans.png'/><p>Beans are the seeds of many plants, applied generally to many other seeds of similar form like <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, peas, <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> etc. Beans are an important source of <b>Protein</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beans</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beans</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beans.png'/><p>Beans are the seeds of many plants, applied generally to many other seeds of similar form like <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, peas, <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> etc. Beans are an important source of <b>Protein</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beer.html b/site/beer.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beer</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beer</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beer.png'/><p>Beer is brewed from cereal grains, like malted barley, wheat, maize and rice. During the brewing process, the starch sugars ferment and produce ethanol and carbonation in the beer. Nowadays, <a href='hops.html'>hops</a> is added to beer, as a preserving agent, but also because it adds bitterness and other flavors. Modern beer ranges from 4 to 6 percent strength ABV (alcohol by volume), but there are varieties that are much lower and much higher than this (up to 20-40 percent).<br /><br />The sediment in craft beer, can be used as a leavening agent in <a href='beer_bread.html'>beer bread</a>.<br /><br />There is some nutritional value in beer, but it varies greatly from beer to beer, and this does not make it essential to good health.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beer</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beer</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beer.png'/><p>Beer is brewed from cereal grains, like malted barley, wheat, maize and rice. During the brewing process, the starch sugars ferment and produce ethanol and carbonation in the beer. Nowadays, <a href='hops.html'>hops</a> is added to beer, as a preserving agent, but also because it adds bitterness and other flavors. Modern beer ranges from 4 to 6 percent strength ABV (alcohol by volume), but there are varieties that are much lower and much higher than this (up to 20-40 percent).<br /><br />The sediment in craft beer, can be used as a leavening agent in <a href='beer_bread.html'>beer bread</a>.<br /><br />There is some nutritional value in beer, but it varies greatly from beer to beer, and this does not make it essential to good health.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beer_bread.html b/site/beer_bread.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beer bread</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>beer bread</h1><h2>1 loaf — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/beer_bread.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Sidney, BC. Canada.<br /><br />The idea of making beer bread came from a book written by Lin Pardey called "The Care and Feeding of the Offshore Crew". In this book, Lin talks about cooking at sea and has an entire chapter dedicated to baking onboard. In this chapter, the authot talks about the many ways to make fresh bread while sailing, including a quickbread recipe that uses 3 basic ingredients: flour, sugar and beer.<br /><br />Beer bread you say? Right up my alley! The next day I gave it a try, the result is fantastic — surprising given the little effort it takes to make it.<br /><br />The best thing about this bread, is that it can taste different everytime. Using different beer, will change the taste and color of the bread. I tried baking with an IPA (21st amendment), a Hefeweizen (Sunriver brewing co) and a brown ale (Hobgoblin).<br /><br />If you have self-rising flour, you can omit the baking powder and salt. You can use even less ingredients if you have a craft beer that has live yeast sediment at the bottom of the bottle. If you have a beer like that only flour, sugar and beer will do. Have fun experimenting with beers in your bread!<br /><br />We made a video of the beer bread-making process, check it out <a href='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppASJRVcXmM' target='_blank'>here</a>.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>beer bread</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='beer.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/beer.png'/><b>beer</b> <u>1 can</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cornmeal.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cornmeal.png'/><b>cornmeal</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rolled_oats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rolled_oats.png'/><b>rolled oats</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat your oven at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Mix all the ingredients together well, and add extra flour if the dough is too sticky — no kneading required.</li><li>Coat the bottom of your bread pan with <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>vegetable oil</a>, make sure to spread it out evenly, and thinly. Sprinkle <a href='corn_meal.html'>corn meal</a> in your bread pan, or tray, shake the cornmeal around so it covers the entire bottom.</li><li>Transfer the bread dough into the pan. Optionally, you can add some rolled oats on top of the bread.</li><li>Bake for <u>1 hour</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a dish towel, or rack.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beer bread</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>beer bread</h1><h2>1 loaf — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/beer_bread.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Sidney, BC. Canada.<br /><br />The idea of making beer bread came from a book written by Lin Pardey called "The Care and Feeding of the Offshore Crew". In this book, Lin talks about cooking at sea and has an entire chapter dedicated to baking onboard. In this chapter, the authot talks about the many ways to make fresh bread while sailing, including a quickbread recipe that uses 3 basic ingredients: flour, sugar and beer.<br /><br />Beer bread you say? Right up my alley! The next day I gave it a try, the result is fantastic — surprising given the little effort it takes to make it.<br /><br />The best thing about this bread, is that it can taste different everytime. Using different beer, will change the taste and color of the bread. I tried baking with an IPA (21st amendment), a Hefeweizen (Sunriver brewing co) and a brown ale (Hobgoblin).<br /><br />If you have self-rising flour, you can omit the baking powder and salt. You can use even less ingredients if you have a craft beer that has live yeast sediment at the bottom of the bottle. If you have a beer like that only flour, sugar and beer will do. Have fun experimenting with beers in your bread!<br /><br />We made a video of the beer bread-making process, check it out <a href='https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppASJRVcXmM' target='_blank'>here</a>.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>beer bread</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='beer.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/beer.png'/><b>beer</b> <u>1 can</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cornmeal.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cornmeal.png'/><b>cornmeal</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rolled_oats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rolled_oats.png'/><b>rolled oats</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat your oven at <u>350F</u>.</li><li>Mix all the ingredients together well, and add extra flour if the dough is too sticky — no kneading required.</li><li>Coat the bottom of your bread pan with <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>vegetable oil</a>, make sure to spread it out evenly, and thinly. Sprinkle <a href='corn_meal.html'>corn meal</a> in your bread pan, or tray, shake the cornmeal around so it covers the entire bottom.</li><li>Transfer the bread dough into the pan. Optionally, you can add some rolled oats on top of the bread.</li><li>Bake for <u>1 hour</u>.</li><li>Let cool on a dish towel, or rack.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beets.html b/site/beets.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beets</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beets</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beets.png'/><p>Beets, or <b>beetroots</b>, are the taproot portion of the beet plant. There are many cultivated varieties, like red beets, golden beats, table beet etc. Beetroot is used as a red food colorant in desserts, candies and a variety of other <a href='raisin_beet_bread.html'>baked goods</a>, <a href='borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.html'>soups</a> and desserts, it's also used to make <a href='roasted_beet_lentils.html'>sauces</a>. Don't be alarmed, red beetroot juice will make your stools and urine red for a day.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beets</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beets</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beets.png'/><p>Beets, or <b>beetroots</b>, are the taproot portion of the beet plant. There are many cultivated varieties, like red beets, golden beats, table beet etc. Beetroot is used as a red food colorant in desserts, candies and a variety of other <a href='raisin_beet_bread.html'>baked goods</a>, <a href='borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.html'>soups</a> and desserts, it's also used to make <a href='roasted_beet_lentils.html'>sauces</a>. Don't be alarmed, red beetroot juice will make your stools and urine red for a day.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beluga_lentils.html b/site/beluga_lentils.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beluga lentils</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beluga lentils</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beluga_lentils.png'/><p>Beluga lentils are black, bead-like, lens-shaped, almost spherical. They have a delicate flavor, and a firm texture that doesn't disintegrate when cooked.<br /><br /></p><h2>lentils</h2><p class='small'>Lentils, or <b>Lens culinaris</b>, is a legume cultivated for its lens-shaped seeds, and they've got the second-highest ratio of protein per calorie of any legume after <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>. Lentils are also a rich source of <b>zinc</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Lentils can be soaked, germinated, boiled, fried and baked. They require a cooking time of 10-40 minutes, depending on variety. The cooking time is shorter for varieties with the husk removed, like red lentils. Lentils without husks tend to soften into purees, while the husked varieties remain whole.<br /><br />Lentils contain antrinutrients, which reduce the bioavailability of dietary minerals. To improve bioavailability, lentils can be soaked, fermented or sprouted (<a href='https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09609.x'>ref</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beluga lentils</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beluga lentils</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beluga_lentils.png'/><p>Beluga lentils are black, bead-like, lens-shaped, almost spherical. They have a delicate flavor, and a firm texture that doesn't disintegrate when cooked.<br /><br /></p><h2>lentils</h2><p class='small'>Lentils, or <b>Lens culinaris</b>, is a legume cultivated for its lens-shaped seeds, and they've got the second-highest ratio of protein per calorie of any legume after <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>. Lentils are also a rich source of <b>zinc</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Lentils can be soaked, germinated, boiled, fried and baked. They require a cooking time of 10-40 minutes, depending on variety. The cooking time is shorter for varieties with the husk removed, like red lentils. Lentils without husks tend to soften into purees, while the husked varieties remain whole.<br /><br />Lentils contain antrinutrients, which reduce the bioavailability of dietary minerals. To improve bioavailability, lentils can be soaked, fermented or sprouted (<a href='https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09609.x'>ref</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/beni_shouga.html b/site/beni_shouga.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beni shouga</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beni shouga</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beni_shouga.png'/><p>Beni shouga, or pickled ginger, is a Japanese pickle or <b>tsukemono 漬物</b>. Beni shouga is made from thin strips of ginger, pickled in <b>umezu 梅酢</b> (plum brine). Umezu is the brine that results during the process of making <b>umeboshi 梅干</b> (pickled plums). Traditionally, the red of the ginger comes from the <b>shiso シソ</b> plant of the genus <b>Perilla</b>, although most commercial products use artificial coloring. Beni shouga is commonly served in yakisoba (sauteed buckwheat noodles) and <a href='#okonomiyaki.html'>okonomiyaki</a><br /><br /></p><h2>ginger root</h2><p class='small'>Ginger root is the rhizome of the Ginger plant, used to flavor dishes. It is pickled, steeped (for hot beverages), candied, brewed into beer, powdered and used in an incredible range of recipes. Dried and powdered ginger can be used as a substitute for fresh at a ratio of 6 to 1, but the flavor differs greatly. Ginger root should be peeled before consumption, and can be refrigerated or frozen for long-term storage.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — beni shouga</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>beni shouga</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/beni_shouga.png'/><p>Beni shouga, or pickled ginger, is a Japanese pickle or <b>tsukemono 漬物</b>. Beni shouga is made from thin strips of ginger, pickled in <b>umezu 梅酢</b> (plum brine). Umezu is the brine that results during the process of making <b>umeboshi 梅干</b> (pickled plums). Traditionally, the red of the ginger comes from the <b>shiso シソ</b> plant of the genus <b>Perilla</b>, although most commercial products use artificial coloring. Beni shouga is commonly served in yakisoba (sauteed buckwheat noodles) and <a href='#okonomiyaki.html'>okonomiyaki</a><br /><br /></p><h2>ginger root</h2><p class='small'>Ginger root is the rhizome of the Ginger plant, used to flavor dishes. It is pickled, steeped (for hot beverages), candied, brewed into beer, powdered and used in an incredible range of recipes. Dried and powdered ginger can be used as a substitute for fresh at a ratio of 6 to 1, but the flavor differs greatly. Ginger root should be peeled before consumption, and can be refrigerated or frozen for long-term storage.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_glutinous_rice.html b/site/black_glutinous_rice.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black glutinous rice</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black glutinous rice</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_glutinous_rice.png'/><p>Black/purple glutinous is unmilled rice, and come from distinct strains from white glutinous rice. It is a dark black/purple color, and has an earthy, nutty taste. This type of rice is rich in <b>iron</b>.<br /><br /><b>How to cook:</b> Soak the the rice in water overnight, or for at least 6h. Add water to a pot, superimpose steam basket and add rice in it, cover with lid and steam for 40 min. After 40 min, pour a cup of hot water over rice, shake rice, and steam for another 10 min. Remove from heat, keep covered until serving time.<br /><br /></p><h2>rice</h2><p class='small'>Rice is the seed of the grass species <b>Oryza sativa</b> (asian rice) or <b>Oryza glaberrima</b> (african rice). Rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans. Many varieties of rice are fortified to reduce malnutrition.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black glutinous rice</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black glutinous rice</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_glutinous_rice.png'/><p>Black/purple glutinous is unmilled rice, and come from distinct strains from white glutinous rice. It is a dark black/purple color, and has an earthy, nutty taste. This type of rice is rich in <b>iron</b>.<br /><br /><b>How to cook:</b> Soak the the rice in water overnight, or for at least 6h. Add water to a pot, superimpose steam basket and add rice in it, cover with lid and steam for 40 min. After 40 min, pour a cup of hot water over rice, shake rice, and steam for another 10 min. Remove from heat, keep covered until serving time.<br /><br /></p><h2>rice</h2><p class='small'>Rice is the seed of the grass species <b>Oryza sativa</b> (asian rice) or <b>Oryza glaberrima</b> (african rice). Rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans. Many varieties of rice are fortified to reduce malnutrition.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_olives.html b/site/black_olives.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black olives</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black olives</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_olives.png'/><p>Ripe olives, or black olives, are picked at full maturity and come in shades of purple to brown to black. Most black olives sold in stores though are not ripe, they're green olives which have been chemically treated so that they are black.</p><h2>olives</h2><p class='small'>Olives come from <b>Olea Europea</b>, a small tree. Olives are the fruit of the olive tree. 90 percent of harvested olives are turned into <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>, while the rest are sold as table olives. Table olives are classified into 3 groups: <b>green olives</b>, <b>turning color olives (semi-ripe)</b> and <b>ripe olives</b>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black olives</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black olives</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_olives.png'/><p>Ripe olives, or black olives, are picked at full maturity and come in shades of purple to brown to black. Most black olives sold in stores though are not ripe, they're green olives which have been chemically treated so that they are black.</p><h2>olives</h2><p class='small'>Olives come from <b>Olea Europea</b>, a small tree. Olives are the fruit of the olive tree. 90 percent of harvested olives are turned into <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>, while the rest are sold as table olives. Table olives are classified into 3 groups: <b>green olives</b>, <b>turning color olives (semi-ripe)</b> and <b>ripe olives</b>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_pepper.html b/site/black_pepper.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black pepper</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black pepper</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><p>Black pepper, or <b>Piper nigrum</b>, is cultivated for its fruit known as a peppercorn. Peppercorn is dried and used a spice and seasoning. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning, and is often paired with salt. There is white peppercorn (sarawak and muntok), black peppercorn (malabar and tellicherry), pink peppercorn and green peppercorn.<br /><br />White pepper consists solely of the seed of the ripe fruit of the pepper plant, with the thin darker-coloured skin (flesh) of the fruit removed. Green pepper, like black pepper, is made from unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green colour, such as with sulphur dioxide, canning, or freeze-drying. Pink peppercorns are the fruits of the Peruvian pepper tree <b>Schinus molle</b>, or its relative, the Brazilian pepper tree, <b>Schinus terebinthifolius</b>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black pepper</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black pepper</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><p>Black pepper, or <b>Piper nigrum</b>, is cultivated for its fruit known as a peppercorn. Peppercorn is dried and used a spice and seasoning. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning, and is often paired with salt. There is white peppercorn (sarawak and muntok), black peppercorn (malabar and tellicherry), pink peppercorn and green peppercorn.<br /><br />White pepper consists solely of the seed of the ripe fruit of the pepper plant, with the thin darker-coloured skin (flesh) of the fruit removed. Green pepper, like black pepper, is made from unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green colour, such as with sulphur dioxide, canning, or freeze-drying. Pink peppercorns are the fruits of the Peruvian pepper tree <b>Schinus molle</b>, or its relative, the Brazilian pepper tree, <b>Schinus terebinthifolius</b>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_sesame_brittle.html b/site/black_sesame_brittle.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame brittle</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame brittle</h1><h2>10 pieces — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_brittle.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Sesame brittle looks impressive when served over desserts, like pieces of black coral. If you like the nutty taste of sesame seeds with a bit of sweet, you will love this recipe.<br /><br />It's simple to make, but requires all of your attention. The sugar syrup becomes solid when cool, which means every step needs to be done quickly. These are no-bake, and are ready to eat almost instantly.<br /><br />These should be served over desserts that aren't too sweet, the sweet of the sesame brittle can be a bit much. I suggest serving it with fruit, or <a href='#kanten_powder.html'>kanten</a> (agar agar based desserts).<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>brittle</h3><dt><a href='brown_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><b>brown sugar</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Prepare baking sheet lined with a baking mat, keep a flat spatula close by.</li><li>Put the <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='brown_sugar.html'>brown sugar</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a> in a pot at medium heat.</li><li>Stir constantly, until the sugar is completely dissolved.</li><li>Add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Mix thoroughly.</li><li>This part is tricky, the mixture solidifies very quickly. You need to do this fast! Take the pot, and pour its contents out onto the baking sheet. With the spatula spread and flatten it out as much as you can.</li><li>Cut the brittle while it's still warm, serve with fresh fruit!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame brittle</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame brittle</h1><h2>10 pieces — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_brittle.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Sesame brittle looks impressive when served over desserts, like pieces of black coral. If you like the nutty taste of sesame seeds with a bit of sweet, you will love this recipe.<br /><br />It's simple to make, but requires all of your attention. The sugar syrup becomes solid when cool, which means every step needs to be done quickly. These are no-bake, and are ready to eat almost instantly.<br /><br />These should be served over desserts that aren't too sweet, the sweet of the sesame brittle can be a bit much. I suggest serving it with fruit, or <a href='#kanten_powder.html'>kanten</a> (agar agar based desserts).<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>brittle</h3><dt><a href='brown_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><b>brown sugar</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Prepare baking sheet lined with a baking mat, keep a flat spatula close by.</li><li>Put the <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='brown_sugar.html'>brown sugar</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a> in a pot at medium heat.</li><li>Stir constantly, until the sugar is completely dissolved.</li><li>Add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Mix thoroughly.</li><li>This part is tricky, the mixture solidifies very quickly. You need to do this fast! Take the pot, and pour its contents out onto the baking sheet. With the spatula spread and flatten it out as much as you can.</li><li>Cut the brittle while it's still warm, serve with fresh fruit!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_sesame_rice_pancakes.html b/site/black_sesame_rice_pancakes.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame rice pancakes</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame rice pancakes</h1><h2>12 servings — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_rice_pancakes.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Black sesame rice pancakes, for those who share my love of sesame.<br /><br />Photo is with a generous dollop of <a href='mango.html'>mango</a>, because sometimes I need a break from maple syrup — okay. No I don't, but here's something different anyway. The real reason I added mango, was because I enjoyed the contrast of colors. Most times, I top my pancakes with <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>.<br /><br /><b>Substitutions:</b> For matcha pancakes, omit the black sesame seeds and add 1 tbsp of matcha powder.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>pancakes</h3><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1 1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rice_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rice_flour.png'/><b>rice flour</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Measure <i>1 1/4 cups</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a>. Let sit for <u>5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Heat <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>, in a non-stick pan at medium heat. Remove once they start to pop. Let cool, then crush into a powder with a mortar and pestle or immersion blender.</li><li>Mix the soured soy milk with <u>1 tsp</u> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> and <i>1/4 cup</i> of ground <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Blend until you get a smooth grey liquid.</li><li>In another bowl, mix <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='rice_flour.html'>rice flour</a>, <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a> and <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a> together.</li><li>Pour wet ingredients into the dry ones, and mix until smooth. Make it as lump-free as you can.</li><li>Heat up non-stick pan at medium heat, add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>. Spoon about <i>1/4 cup</i> of batter into the pan. Flip once the bottoms have browned, and little bubbles appear at the top.</li><li>Repeat for the rest of the pancake mix.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame rice pancakes</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame rice pancakes</h1><h2>12 servings — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_rice_pancakes.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Black sesame rice pancakes, for those who share my love of sesame.<br /><br />Photo is with a generous dollop of <a href='mango.html'>mango</a>, because sometimes I need a break from maple syrup — okay. No I don't, but here's something different anyway. The real reason I added mango, was because I enjoyed the contrast of colors. Most times, I top my pancakes with <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>.<br /><br /><b>Substitutions:</b> For matcha pancakes, omit the black sesame seeds and add 1 tbsp of matcha powder.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>pancakes</h3><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1 1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vanilla_extract.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vanilla_extract.png'/><b>vanilla extract</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rice_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rice_flour.png'/><b>rice flour</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Measure <i>1 1/4 cups</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a>. Let sit for <u>5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Heat <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>, in a non-stick pan at medium heat. Remove once they start to pop. Let cool, then crush into a powder with a mortar and pestle or immersion blender.</li><li>Mix the soured soy milk with <u>1 tsp</u> of <a href='vanilla_extract.html'>vanilla extract</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> and <i>1/4 cup</i> of ground <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Blend until you get a smooth grey liquid.</li><li>In another bowl, mix <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='rice_flour.html'>rice flour</a>, <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a> and <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a> together.</li><li>Pour wet ingredients into the dry ones, and mix until smooth. Make it as lump-free as you can.</li><li>Heat up non-stick pan at medium heat, add <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>. Spoon about <i>1/4 cup</i> of batter into the pan. Flip once the bottoms have browned, and little bubbles appear at the top.</li><li>Repeat for the rest of the pancake mix.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_sesame_seeds.html b/site/black_sesame_seeds.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black sesame seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><p>Black sesame is the seed of a flowering plant of the genus <b>Sesamum</b>. It has the highest oil content of any seed, with a nutty flavor. Black sesame seeds are high in <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Sesame seeds are added to breads, or over the top of baked goods, they are also baked into <a href='crackers.html'>crackers</a> or sprinkled onto a variety of foods. Popular uses of black sesame seeds also include <b>gomashio</b> (Japanese sesame salt) and <b>chikki</b> (Indian sweet brittle). The seeds need stored at 6 percent moisture or less. If the seed is too moist, it can quickly heat up and become rancid.<br /><br /></p><h2>sesame seeds</h2><p class='small'>Sesame seeds has many other species, coming in a variety of colors ranging from light to dark. It has the highest oil content of any seed, with a nutty flavor. Sesame seeds are high in <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Sesame seeds are added to breads, or over the top of baked goods, they are also baked into <a href='crackers.html'>crackers</a> or sprinkled onto a variety of foods. Popular uses of sesame seeds also include <a href='tahini.html'>tahini</a> and <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a>. The seeds need stored at 6 percent moisture or less. If the seed is too moist, it can quickly heat up and become rancid.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>black sesame seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><p>Black sesame is the seed of a flowering plant of the genus <b>Sesamum</b>. It has the highest oil content of any seed, with a nutty flavor. Black sesame seeds are high in <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Sesame seeds are added to breads, or over the top of baked goods, they are also baked into <a href='crackers.html'>crackers</a> or sprinkled onto a variety of foods. Popular uses of black sesame seeds also include <b>gomashio</b> (Japanese sesame salt) and <b>chikki</b> (Indian sweet brittle). The seeds need stored at 6 percent moisture or less. If the seed is too moist, it can quickly heat up and become rancid.<br /><br /></p><h2>sesame seeds</h2><p class='small'>Sesame seeds has many other species, coming in a variety of colors ranging from light to dark. It has the highest oil content of any seed, with a nutty flavor. Sesame seeds are high in <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Sesame seeds are added to breads, or over the top of baked goods, they are also baked into <a href='crackers.html'>crackers</a> or sprinkled onto a variety of foods. Popular uses of sesame seeds also include <a href='tahini.html'>tahini</a> and <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a>. The seeds need stored at 6 percent moisture or less. If the seed is too moist, it can quickly heat up and become rancid.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/black_sesame_syrup.html b/site/black_sesame_syrup.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame syrup</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame syrup</h1><h2>2 servings — 120 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_syrup.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I like making syrups, or juice reductions a lot. It's simple, and you can use it in many other recipes afterwards! Reductions that aren't sweetened with sugar, you can use as add-on to sauces, or alone as a 'glaze'.<br /><br />I used a technique by the cook <a href='https://discoginferno.wordpress.com/tag/sesame-seed-syrup' target='_blank'>Mike Case</a>, he made a white sesame syrup to use in cocktails. I liked not requiring a blender to make it, blending sesame seeds into a smooth liquid is hard, my immersion blender can't grind seeds finely. Boiling the seeds, and then straining them out is simple. And since you can re-use the seeds afterwards, there's no waste! The fact the seeds are toasted beforehand helps to bring out the nutty flavour, so whatever you do, don't skip that step!<br /><br />This syrup pairs well with ice cream, especially those with subtle flavors like coconut and vanilla. It's also delicious on fruit ice cream. To make fruit ice cream, slice fruit of choice thinly. Lay a sheet of parchment paper over a plate, and lay your fruit overtop (this will keep the fruit from sticking). Let them freeze for a few hours, then run them through an immersion blender. You can use almost any fruit to make it, but it works especially well for <a href='mango.html'>mango</a> and <a href='bananas.html'>bananas</a>.<br /><br />You can use the left-over seeds to bake into desserts, or to add as an extra topping.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>syrup</h3><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a> in a pan, bring to medium heat and toast them until they start to pop.</li><li>In a pot, combine <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> with the <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Bring to a boil and let simmer for <u>10-15 minutes</u>.</li><li>Strain liquid from sesame seeds using a cheese cloth or with a mesh strainer, squeezing out as much liquid as you can. Reserve sesame seeds for later use.</li><li>Return liquid to pot, add <i>1/2 cup</i> of {whole cane sugar}} and bring to medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Remove from heat and let cool.</li><li>Serve of fresh fruit, or fruit ice cream.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — black sesame syrup</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>black sesame syrup</h1><h2>2 servings — 120 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/black_sesame_syrup.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I like making syrups, or juice reductions a lot. It's simple, and you can use it in many other recipes afterwards! Reductions that aren't sweetened with sugar, you can use as add-on to sauces, or alone as a 'glaze'.<br /><br />I used a technique by the cook <a href='https://discoginferno.wordpress.com/tag/sesame-seed-syrup' target='_blank'>Mike Case</a>, he made a white sesame syrup to use in cocktails. I liked not requiring a blender to make it, blending sesame seeds into a smooth liquid is hard, my immersion blender can't grind seeds finely. Boiling the seeds, and then straining them out is simple. And since you can re-use the seeds afterwards, there's no waste! The fact the seeds are toasted beforehand helps to bring out the nutty flavour, so whatever you do, don't skip that step!<br /><br />This syrup pairs well with ice cream, especially those with subtle flavors like coconut and vanilla. It's also delicious on fruit ice cream. To make fruit ice cream, slice fruit of choice thinly. Lay a sheet of parchment paper over a plate, and lay your fruit overtop (this will keep the fruit from sticking). Let them freeze for a few hours, then run them through an immersion blender. You can use almost any fruit to make it, but it works especially well for <a href='mango.html'>mango</a> and <a href='bananas.html'>bananas</a>.<br /><br />You can use the left-over seeds to bake into desserts, or to add as an extra topping.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>syrup</h3><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Put <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a> in a pan, bring to medium heat and toast them until they start to pop.</li><li>In a pot, combine <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> with the <a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'>black sesame seeds</a>. Bring to a boil and let simmer for <u>10-15 minutes</u>.</li><li>Strain liquid from sesame seeds using a cheese cloth or with a mesh strainer, squeezing out as much liquid as you can. Reserve sesame seeds for later use.</li><li>Return liquid to pot, add <i>1/2 cup</i> of {whole cane sugar}} and bring to medium heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Remove from heat and let cool.</li><li>Serve of fresh fruit, or fruit ice cream.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/blackberries.html b/site/blackberries.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — blackberries</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>blackberries</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/blackberries.png'/><p>Blackberry is used as a generic term to refer to a wide range of bush berries ( loganberries, boysenberries, marionberries and ollalieberries), the fruit is a member of the <b>Rosaceae</b> family and of the <b>Rubus</b> genus. They are sweet, slightly tart and juicy. Blackberries are a good source of <b>vitamin A</b>, <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>calcium</b>. Blackberries can be added to both sweet and savory dishes.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — blackberries</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>blackberries</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/blackberries.png'/><p>Blackberry is used as a generic term to refer to a wide range of bush berries ( loganberries, boysenberries, marionberries and ollalieberries), the fruit is a member of the <b>Rosaceae</b> family and of the <b>Rubus</b> genus. They are sweet, slightly tart and juicy. Blackberries are a good source of <b>vitamin A</b>, <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>calcium</b>. Blackberries can be added to both sweet and savory dishes.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bok_choy.html b/site/bok_choy.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bok choy</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bok choy</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bok_choy.png'/><p>Bok Choy (Brassica rapa), or <b>pok choy</b>, is a winter-hardy vegetable, a type of Chinese cabbage. Bok Choy is a rich source of <b>vitamin A</b> and <b>C</b>, and provides some <b>calcium</b>.<br /><br />Raw bok choy should not be consumed in large mounts over extended periods as it can inhibit uptake of iodine (<a href='https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc0911005'>ref</a>).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bok choy</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bok choy</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bok_choy.png'/><p>Bok Choy (Brassica rapa), or <b>pok choy</b>, is a winter-hardy vegetable, a type of Chinese cabbage. Bok Choy is a rich source of <b>vitamin A</b> and <b>C</b>, and provides some <b>calcium</b>.<br /><br />Raw bok choy should not be consumed in large mounts over extended periods as it can inhibit uptake of iodine (<a href='https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc0911005'>ref</a>).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.html b/site/borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — borscht with tofu sour cream</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>borscht with tofu sour cream</h1><h2>4 quarts — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Devine has been taking russian classes every week, and he comes back from his lessons with new words to teach me. Last week, he not only returned with new words, he also brought back a Borscht recipe.<br /><br />Borscht is traditionally served with sour cream. A lot of vegan sour cream recipes have cashews, because of my tree nut allergy, i had to opt for something different. soft tofu does the job well, the mix of that plus lemon and apple cider vinegar gives a perfect sour taste!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sour cream</h3><dt><a href='soft_tofu.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soft_tofu.png'/><b>soft tofu</b> <u>1 pack</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>5 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Drain the pack of <a href='soft_tofu.html'>soft tofu</a>, press it lightly with a cloth or paper towels to remove some of the water.</li><li>Put the <a href='tofu.html'>tofu</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and <i>5 tsp</i> of <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a> in a bowl. Blend until smooth.</li><li>Put in the refrigerator for <u>1 hour</u> to give it time to thicken.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>borscht</h3><dt><a href='vegetable_bouillon.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vegetable_bouillon.png'/><b>vegetable bouillon</b> <u>4 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_beets.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_beets.png'/><b>red beets</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sweet_potatoes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sweet_potatoes.png'/><b>sweet potatoes</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_onion.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_onion.png'/><b>red onion</b> <u>1/2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>3</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tomato_paste.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tomato_paste.png'/><b>tomato paste</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_cabbage.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_cabbage.png'/><b>red cabbage</b> <u>2 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bay_leaf.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bay_leaf.png'/><b>bay leaf</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Bring <i>4 cups</i> of <a href='vegetable_bouillon.html'>vegetable bouillon</a> to a boil, add <i>2 peeled medium-sized</i> <a href='red_beets.html'>red beets</a>. Boil until softened.</li><li>Peel and slice <i>1 medium-sized</i> <a href='sweet_potato.html'>sweet potato</a>. Add to pot and let boil for <u>15 minutes</u>.</li><li>While the potatoes are cooking, peel and julienne <i>2 carrots</i>, cut <i>1/2</i> a <a href='red_onion.html'>red onion</a> and mince <i>3 cloves</i> of <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a>. Add it all to a pan and fry until fragrant. Near the end add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='tomato_paste.html'>tomato paste</a>, then toss in the pot.</li><li>Cut <i>1/2 head</i> of a small <a href='red_cabbage.html'>red cabbage</a> into thin strips, add to pot.</li><li>Put <i>1</i> <a href='bay_leaf.html'>bay leaf</a>, season with <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> and <a href='pepper.html'>pepper</a> and let it simmer for <u>10 minutes</u> or until all the veggies are nice and soft.</li><li>At the end, take pot off heat and stir in <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a>. You can serve as is if you like a chunkier soup, otherwise purée it with a handblender. Serve hot with tofu sour cream! For thicker and tastier Borscht, cook the soup the day before you plan to eat it. Let it cool and refrigerate it. It tastes better the next day, just re-heat it. Trust me, it'll be delicious.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — borscht with tofu sour cream</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>borscht with tofu sour cream</h1><h2>4 quarts — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/borscht_with_tofu_sour_cream.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Devine has been taking russian classes every week, and he comes back from his lessons with new words to teach me. Last week, he not only returned with new words, he also brought back a Borscht recipe.<br /><br />Borscht is traditionally served with sour cream. A lot of vegan sour cream recipes have cashews, because of my tree nut allergy, i had to opt for something different. soft tofu does the job well, the mix of that plus lemon and apple cider vinegar gives a perfect sour taste!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sour cream</h3><dt><a href='soft_tofu.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soft_tofu.png'/><b>soft tofu</b> <u>1 pack</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>5 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Drain the pack of <a href='soft_tofu.html'>soft tofu</a>, press it lightly with a cloth or paper towels to remove some of the water.</li><li>Put the <a href='tofu.html'>tofu</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and <i>5 tsp</i> of <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a> in a bowl. Blend until smooth.</li><li>Put in the refrigerator for <u>1 hour</u> to give it time to thicken.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>borscht</h3><dt><a href='vegetable_bouillon.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vegetable_bouillon.png'/><b>vegetable bouillon</b> <u>4 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_beets.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_beets.png'/><b>red beets</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sweet_potatoes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sweet_potatoes.png'/><b>sweet potatoes</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_onion.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_onion.png'/><b>red onion</b> <u>1/2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>3</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tomato_paste.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tomato_paste.png'/><b>tomato paste</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='red_cabbage.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/red_cabbage.png'/><b>red cabbage</b> <u>2 1/2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bay_leaf.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bay_leaf.png'/><b>bay leaf</b> <u>1</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Bring <i>4 cups</i> of <a href='vegetable_bouillon.html'>vegetable bouillon</a> to a boil, add <i>2 peeled medium-sized</i> <a href='red_beets.html'>red beets</a>. Boil until softened.</li><li>Peel and slice <i>1 medium-sized</i> <a href='sweet_potato.html'>sweet potato</a>. Add to pot and let boil for <u>15 minutes</u>.</li><li>While the potatoes are cooking, peel and julienne <i>2 carrots</i>, cut <i>1/2</i> a <a href='red_onion.html'>red onion</a> and mince <i>3 cloves</i> of <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a>. Add it all to a pan and fry until fragrant. Near the end add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='tomato_paste.html'>tomato paste</a>, then toss in the pot.</li><li>Cut <i>1/2 head</i> of a small <a href='red_cabbage.html'>red cabbage</a> into thin strips, add to pot.</li><li>Put <i>1</i> <a href='bay_leaf.html'>bay leaf</a>, season with <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> and <a href='pepper.html'>pepper</a> and let it simmer for <u>10 minutes</u> or until all the veggies are nice and soft.</li><li>At the end, take pot off heat and stir in <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='lemon_juice.html'>lemon juice</a>. You can serve as is if you like a chunkier soup, otherwise purée it with a handblender. Serve hot with tofu sour cream! For thicker and tastier Borscht, cook the soup the day before you plan to eat it. Let it cool and refrigerate it. It tastes better the next day, just re-heat it. Trust me, it'll be delicious.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bread_crusts.html b/site/bread_crusts.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bread crusts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bread crusts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bread_crusts.png'/><p>The browned outer layer of bread, which is used in a variety of recipes like <a href='mason_jar_bread_pudding.html'>bread pudding</a>, or to make breading for fried foods.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bread crusts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bread crusts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bread_crusts.png'/><p>The browned outer layer of bread, which is used in a variety of recipes like <a href='mason_jar_bread_pudding.html'>bread pudding</a>, or to make breading for fried foods.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/breadfruit.html b/site/breadfruit.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>breadfruit</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit.png'/><p>Breadfruit are prickly with yellow-green skin. Their appearances depends on the variety and growing conditions. When immature, the fruit is hard, and the flesh is starchy and a bit fibrous. Ripe breadfruit becomes soft, with the skin turning a yellow color, it also develops a creamy texture with a sweet aroma. Breadfruit is a high-energy food, containing all 9 EAA's. It's rich in <b>protein</b>, and contains <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Breadfruit trees can grow more than 80 feet tall, they are one of the highest yielding food plants with a single tree producing up to 450 pounds of fruit per year. Because of it's high-yield and energy content, it has the potential to address world hunger. Breadfruit is a delicious substitute for any starchy root crop, vegetable, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a>, <a href='#breadfruit_gnocchi.html'>potato</a>, or rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>breadfruit</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit.png'/><p>Breadfruit are prickly with yellow-green skin. Their appearances depends on the variety and growing conditions. When immature, the fruit is hard, and the flesh is starchy and a bit fibrous. Ripe breadfruit becomes soft, with the skin turning a yellow color, it also develops a creamy texture with a sweet aroma. Breadfruit is a high-energy food, containing all 9 EAA's. It's rich in <b>protein</b>, and contains <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Breadfruit trees can grow more than 80 feet tall, they are one of the highest yielding food plants with a single tree producing up to 450 pounds of fruit per year. Because of it's high-yield and energy content, it has the potential to address world hunger. Breadfruit is a delicious substitute for any starchy root crop, vegetable, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a>, <a href='#breadfruit_gnocchi.html'>potato</a>, or rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/breadfruit_flour.html b/site/breadfruit_flour.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>breadfruit flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit_flour.png'/><p>The product of dried and ground breadfruit. It it used to make cookies, cakes, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a> and a number of other recipes.</p><h2>breadfruit</h2><p class='small'>Breadfruit are prickly with yellow-green skin. Their appearances depends on the variety and growing conditions. When immature, the fruit is hard, and the flesh is starchy and a bit fibrous. Ripe breadfruit becomes soft, with the skin turning a yellow color, it also develops a creamy texture with a sweet aroma. Breadfruit is a high-energy food, containing all 9 EAA's. It's rich in <b>protein</b>, and contains <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Breadfruit trees can grow more than 80 feet tall, they are one of the highest yielding food plants with a single tree producing up to 450 pounds of fruit per year. Because of it's high-yield and energy content, it has the potential to address world hunger. Breadfruit is a delicious substitute for any starchy root crop, vegetable, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a>, <a href='#breadfruit_gnocchi.html'>potato</a>, or rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>breadfruit flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit_flour.png'/><p>The product of dried and ground breadfruit. It it used to make cookies, cakes, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a> and a number of other recipes.</p><h2>breadfruit</h2><p class='small'>Breadfruit are prickly with yellow-green skin. Their appearances depends on the variety and growing conditions. When immature, the fruit is hard, and the flesh is starchy and a bit fibrous. Ripe breadfruit becomes soft, with the skin turning a yellow color, it also develops a creamy texture with a sweet aroma. Breadfruit is a high-energy food, containing all 9 EAA's. It's rich in <b>protein</b>, and contains <b>vitamin C</b>, <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Breadfruit trees can grow more than 80 feet tall, they are one of the highest yielding food plants with a single tree producing up to 450 pounds of fruit per year. Because of it's high-yield and energy content, it has the potential to address world hunger. Breadfruit is a delicious substitute for any starchy root crop, vegetable, <a href='#breadfruit_pasta.html'>pasta</a>, <a href='#breadfruit_gnocchi.html'>potato</a>, or rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/breadfruit_gnocchi.html b/site/breadfruit_gnocchi.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit gnocchi</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>breadfruit gnocchi</h1><h2>4 people — 90 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_gnocchi.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Vava'u, Tonga<br /><br />We are about to leave Tonga, the tropics and the land of bountiful <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a>. This versatile fruit can be cooked into fries, eaten with <a href='coconut_milk.html'>coconut milk</a>, made into chips, or like this recipe suggests, it can be made into gnocchi.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_gnocchi_1.jpg'/><br /><br />Breadfruit has a taste and texture that resembles that of <a href='potato.html'>potato</a>, and so it makes sense that it too can be made into gnocchi. The flesh of the fruit can be kneaded with ease, especially if the fruit is very ripe. I have tried to knead it when half-ripe, it works too, but requires added moisture and more kneading - not to mention that it doesn't have as much flavor. Ripe breadfruit develops a sweet taste. It can be difficult to catch it at the right moment, like avocados they have a tendency to overripen overnight. Because we like it so much, we've bought many and have had time to better tell when it can be eaten. The outside becomes soft to the touch, but only just.<br /><br />We serve these with a light sauce, to better taste the gnocchi. A sauce that we enjoy, is minced garlic and chili peppers cooked in olive oil. The sauce is poured overtop and sprinkled with bits of shredded nori.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/pan.fried_breadfruit_1.jpg'/><br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>gnocchi</h3><dt><a href='breadfruit.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit.png'/><b>breadfruit</b> <u>1 small</u></a></dt><dt><a href='olive_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/olive_oil.png'/><b>olive oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 1/4 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Wait until your <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> is very ripe, soft to the touch. A softer breadfruit will be easier to knead, and will taste sweeter.</li><li>Preheat oven to <u>425F</u>. Rub outside of breadfruit with <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>, and wrap with aluminium foil. Cook for <u>1 hour</u>.</li><li>Remove foil, peel skin away, cut in half, and remove the seed.</li><li>Let cool, and mash with your hands into a cohesive dough. Add <a href='flour.html'>flour</a>, <i>1/4 cup</i> at a time, until the <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> flesh stops sticking to your fingers. You may need more, or less, depending on the size of your fruit.</li><li>Sprinkle your work surface with <a href='flour.html'>flour</a>, take a golf-sized ball of dough, and roll it into a thin, finger-sized log. Cut the log into bite-sized pieces (around 2cm long) and repeat for the rest of the dough.</li><li>At this point, you can choose to freeze the gnocchi, or to prepare them straight away. To cook them, bring a pot of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, add the gnocchi, and cook for <u>5 minutes</u> or so, or <i>until they start to rise to the surface</i>.</li><li>Serve with a light sauce, to better taste the subtle, but sweet flavor of the breadfruit gnocchi.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit gnocchi</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>breadfruit gnocchi</h1><h2>4 people — 90 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_gnocchi.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Vava'u, Tonga<br /><br />We are about to leave Tonga, the tropics and the land of bountiful <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a>. This versatile fruit can be cooked into fries, eaten with <a href='coconut_milk.html'>coconut milk</a>, made into chips, or like this recipe suggests, it can be made into gnocchi.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_gnocchi_1.jpg'/><br /><br />Breadfruit has a taste and texture that resembles that of <a href='potato.html'>potato</a>, and so it makes sense that it too can be made into gnocchi. The flesh of the fruit can be kneaded with ease, especially if the fruit is very ripe. I have tried to knead it when half-ripe, it works too, but requires added moisture and more kneading - not to mention that it doesn't have as much flavor. Ripe breadfruit develops a sweet taste. It can be difficult to catch it at the right moment, like avocados they have a tendency to overripen overnight. Because we like it so much, we've bought many and have had time to better tell when it can be eaten. The outside becomes soft to the touch, but only just.<br /><br />We serve these with a light sauce, to better taste the gnocchi. A sauce that we enjoy, is minced garlic and chili peppers cooked in olive oil. The sauce is poured overtop and sprinkled with bits of shredded nori.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/pan.fried_breadfruit_1.jpg'/><br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>gnocchi</h3><dt><a href='breadfruit.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit.png'/><b>breadfruit</b> <u>1 small</u></a></dt><dt><a href='olive_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/olive_oil.png'/><b>olive oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 1/4 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Wait until your <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> is very ripe, soft to the touch. A softer breadfruit will be easier to knead, and will taste sweeter.</li><li>Preheat oven to <u>425F</u>. Rub outside of breadfruit with <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>, and wrap with aluminium foil. Cook for <u>1 hour</u>.</li><li>Remove foil, peel skin away, cut in half, and remove the seed.</li><li>Let cool, and mash with your hands into a cohesive dough. Add <a href='flour.html'>flour</a>, <i>1/4 cup</i> at a time, until the <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> flesh stops sticking to your fingers. You may need more, or less, depending on the size of your fruit.</li><li>Sprinkle your work surface with <a href='flour.html'>flour</a>, take a golf-sized ball of dough, and roll it into a thin, finger-sized log. Cut the log into bite-sized pieces (around 2cm long) and repeat for the rest of the dough.</li><li>At this point, you can choose to freeze the gnocchi, or to prepare them straight away. To cook them, bring a pot of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, add the gnocchi, and cook for <u>5 minutes</u> or so, or <i>until they start to rise to the surface</i>.</li><li>Serve with a light sauce, to better taste the subtle, but sweet flavor of the breadfruit gnocchi.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/breadfruit_pasta.html b/site/breadfruit_pasta.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit pasta</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>breadfruit pasta</h1><h2>4 people — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Suva, Fiji.<br /><br />Yes, another <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> recipe! This fruit is one of the most versatile ingredients I've ever cooked with, it's cheap and pairs well with just about anything. When we returned to the south pacific last june, you can be sure that the first thing we went looking for at the market was this lovely green wonder. It's become a staple for us, a treat and food we are excited to cook and eat.<br /><br />While in a grocery store in Fiji, we spotted breadfruit flour! A company called <b><a href='http://friendfiji.com' target='_blank'>Friend's Fiji style</a></b> sells it in bags of 300g. It's a good alternative if the fresh kind can't be found. It's something we'll stock up on when we leave, so we continue to have breadfruit in our diet (in some form).<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_1.jpg'/><br /><br />Making pasta from scratch requires your hands, a knife and a rolling pin (or bottle, whatever works). Making pasta by hand that is even and thin is a challenge, it's easier to opt for thicker 'udon-style' noodles. Expert soba chefs in Japan can cut noodles thinly, but this requires experienced hands. We have a good blade, but lack the patience as well as the desire to cut even noodles. We're very okay with imperfect noodles.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_2.jpg'/><br /><br /><b>Tricks for cutting pasta evenly:</b> Roll the flattened piece of dough and cutting it cross-wise is the key, the details on how to do this are in the recipe instructions below.<br /><br />If you come to Fiji and like to make pasta from scratch, try and find some breadfruit flour. That same company also produces cassava flour.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_3.jpg'/><br /><br />We like to eat breadfruit pasta with garlic, chilis and bitter melon, sauteed in olive oil with some shredded nori on top- simple, and tasty. Alternatively, to make regular pasta, just sub the breadfruit flour for <a href='whole_wheat_flour.html'>whole wheat flour</a> or <a href='spelt_flour.html'>spelt flour</a>.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>breadfruit pasta</h3><dt><a href='breadfruit_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit_flour.png'/><b>breadfruit flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a large bowl, mix <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='breadfruit_flour.html'>breadfruit flour</a>.</li><li>Add <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, mix well.</li><li>Add <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, mix until it starts to clump up, then knead with your hands until you have a smooth dough. Let rest for <u>20 mins</u> (this will make it easier to roll).</li><li>Separate dough in two, put one half aside. Separating the dough makes it easier to roll if you have limited counter space (like I do).</li><li>Sprinkle flour on your working surface, flatten the ball out from the center to the outer edge. Continue to roll, flipping the dough over once or twice and dusting it with flour to prevent it sticking. Roll to desired thickness.</li><li>Fold the sheet of dough into a flat roll, then cut into it cross-wise into 0.5cm strips.</li><li>Repeat all the steps for the other half of the dough.</li><li>Carefully unroll each coil with your fingers, then transfer to a floured surface.</li><li>Bring water to a boil. Add pasta. Cook for a minute or so, and serve with a light sauce!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — breadfruit pasta</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>breadfruit pasta</h1><h2>4 people — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Suva, Fiji.<br /><br />Yes, another <a href='breadfruit.html'>breadfruit</a> recipe! This fruit is one of the most versatile ingredients I've ever cooked with, it's cheap and pairs well with just about anything. When we returned to the south pacific last june, you can be sure that the first thing we went looking for at the market was this lovely green wonder. It's become a staple for us, a treat and food we are excited to cook and eat.<br /><br />While in a grocery store in Fiji, we spotted breadfruit flour! A company called <b><a href='http://friendfiji.com' target='_blank'>Friend's Fiji style</a></b> sells it in bags of 300g. It's a good alternative if the fresh kind can't be found. It's something we'll stock up on when we leave, so we continue to have breadfruit in our diet (in some form).<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_1.jpg'/><br /><br />Making pasta from scratch requires your hands, a knife and a rolling pin (or bottle, whatever works). Making pasta by hand that is even and thin is a challenge, it's easier to opt for thicker 'udon-style' noodles. Expert soba chefs in Japan can cut noodles thinly, but this requires experienced hands. We have a good blade, but lack the patience as well as the desire to cut even noodles. We're very okay with imperfect noodles.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_2.jpg'/><br /><br /><b>Tricks for cutting pasta evenly:</b> Roll the flattened piece of dough and cutting it cross-wise is the key, the details on how to do this are in the recipe instructions below.<br /><br />If you come to Fiji and like to make pasta from scratch, try and find some breadfruit flour. That same company also produces cassava flour.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/breadfruit_pasta_3.jpg'/><br /><br />We like to eat breadfruit pasta with garlic, chilis and bitter melon, sauteed in olive oil with some shredded nori on top- simple, and tasty. Alternatively, to make regular pasta, just sub the breadfruit flour for <a href='whole_wheat_flour.html'>whole wheat flour</a> or <a href='spelt_flour.html'>spelt flour</a>.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>breadfruit pasta</h3><dt><a href='breadfruit_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/breadfruit_flour.png'/><b>breadfruit flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a large bowl, mix <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='breadfruit_flour.html'>breadfruit flour</a>.</li><li>Add <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, mix well.</li><li>Add <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, mix until it starts to clump up, then knead with your hands until you have a smooth dough. Let rest for <u>20 mins</u> (this will make it easier to roll).</li><li>Separate dough in two, put one half aside. Separating the dough makes it easier to roll if you have limited counter space (like I do).</li><li>Sprinkle flour on your working surface, flatten the ball out from the center to the outer edge. Continue to roll, flipping the dough over once or twice and dusting it with flour to prevent it sticking. Roll to desired thickness.</li><li>Fold the sheet of dough into a flat roll, then cut into it cross-wise into 0.5cm strips.</li><li>Repeat all the steps for the other half of the dough.</li><li>Carefully unroll each coil with your fingers, then transfer to a floured surface.</li><li>Bring water to a boil. Add pasta. Cook for a minute or so, and serve with a light sauce!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/brown_lentils.html b/site/brown_lentils.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown lentils</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown lentils</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_lentils.png'/><p>The most common variety of lentils, found in most grocery stores. They have a mild, earthy-flavor, with a firm texture that doesn't disintegrate when cooked.<br /><br /></p><h2>lentils</h2><p class='small'>Lentils, or <b>Lens culinaris</b>, is a legume cultivated for its lens-shaped seeds, and they've got the second-highest ratio of protein per calorie of any legume after <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>. Lentils are also a rich source of <b>zinc</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Lentils can be soaked, germinated, boiled, fried and baked. They require a cooking time of 10-40 minutes, depending on variety. The cooking time is shorter for varieties with the husk removed, like red lentils. Lentils without husks tend to soften into purees, while the husked varieties remain whole.<br /><br />Lentils contain antrinutrients, which reduce the bioavailability of dietary minerals. To improve bioavailability, lentils can be soaked, fermented or sprouted (<a href='https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09609.x'>ref</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown lentils</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown lentils</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_lentils.png'/><p>The most common variety of lentils, found in most grocery stores. They have a mild, earthy-flavor, with a firm texture that doesn't disintegrate when cooked.<br /><br /></p><h2>lentils</h2><p class='small'>Lentils, or <b>Lens culinaris</b>, is a legume cultivated for its lens-shaped seeds, and they've got the second-highest ratio of protein per calorie of any legume after <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>. Lentils are also a rich source of <b>zinc</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Lentils can be soaked, germinated, boiled, fried and baked. They require a cooking time of 10-40 minutes, depending on variety. The cooking time is shorter for varieties with the husk removed, like red lentils. Lentils without husks tend to soften into purees, while the husked varieties remain whole.<br /><br />Lentils contain antrinutrients, which reduce the bioavailability of dietary minerals. To improve bioavailability, lentils can be soaked, fermented or sprouted (<a href='https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09609.x'>ref</a>).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/brown_rice_syrup.html b/site/brown_rice_syrup.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown rice syrup</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown rice syrup</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_rice_syrup.png'/><p>Brown rice syrup, or brown rice malt, is a sweetener. Is is made by steeping cooked rice starch with enzymes that break them down, the liquid is then strained off and reduced until the desired consistency is reached. Rice syrup has a shelf life of about a year, and once opened, should be stored in a cool, dry place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown rice syrup</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown rice syrup</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_rice_syrup.png'/><p>Brown rice syrup, or brown rice malt, is a sweetener. Is is made by steeping cooked rice starch with enzymes that break them down, the liquid is then strained off and reduced until the desired consistency is reached. Rice syrup has a shelf life of about a year, and once opened, should be stored in a cool, dry place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/brown_sugar.html b/site/brown_sugar.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown sugar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown sugar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><p>Brown sugar has a brown color because of the presence of molasses. Brown sugar adds flavor to desserts and baked goods, and caramelizes better than refined sugar.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brown sugar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brown sugar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><p>Brown sugar has a brown color because of the presence of molasses. Brown sugar adds flavor to desserts and baked goods, and caramelizes better than refined sugar.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/brussel_sprouts.html b/site/brussel_sprouts.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brussel sprouts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brussel sprouts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brussel_sprouts.png'/><p>Brussel sprouts, or <b>Brassica oleracea</b>, belong to the <b>Brassica</b> family. They are leafy vegetables that are high in <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>. Their color ranges from sea green to fern green, other varieties exhibit violet hues.<br /><br />To prepare them, cut the buds from the stalk and cut the surplus of stems away, as well as any loose surface leaves. Once they are cut and clean, they can be boiled, steamed, stir-fried, grilled or roasted. Making a cross at the center of the stem can help the buds cook better.</p><h2>green cabbage</h2><p class='small'>Green cabbage is a vegetable with dense-leaved heads, closely related to <a href='broccoli.html'>broccoli</a>, <a href='brussel_sprouts.html'>brussel sprouts</a> and <a href='cauliflower.html'>cauliflower</a>. Cabbage can be pickled, fermented, steamed, stewed, sauteed, braised or consumed raw. Cabbage is a source of <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>.<br /><br />There are winter and summer cabbages, winter cabbages are more dense while summer cabbages are lighter and sweet.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — brussel sprouts</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>brussel sprouts</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/brussel_sprouts.png'/><p>Brussel sprouts, or <b>Brassica oleracea</b>, belong to the <b>Brassica</b> family. They are leafy vegetables that are high in <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>. Their color ranges from sea green to fern green, other varieties exhibit violet hues.<br /><br />To prepare them, cut the buds from the stalk and cut the surplus of stems away, as well as any loose surface leaves. Once they are cut and clean, they can be boiled, steamed, stir-fried, grilled or roasted. Making a cross at the center of the stem can help the buds cook better.</p><h2>green cabbage</h2><p class='small'>Green cabbage is a vegetable with dense-leaved heads, closely related to <a href='broccoli.html'>broccoli</a>, <a href='brussel_sprouts.html'>brussel sprouts</a> and <a href='cauliflower.html'>cauliflower</a>. Cabbage can be pickled, fermented, steamed, stewed, sauteed, braised or consumed raw. Cabbage is a source of <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>.<br /><br />There are winter and summer cabbages, winter cabbages are more dense while summer cabbages are lighter and sweet.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/buckwheat_flour.html b/site/buckwheat_flour.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_flour.png'/><p>Buckwheat flour is made from ground buckwheat groats. It is often used partially in recipes with wheat flour. Use buckwheat flour for making buckwheat pancakes, noodles, and as a replacement for wheat flour in baked goods. As buckwheat contains no gluten, it may be eaten by people with gluten-related disorders.</p><h2>buckwheat groats</h2><p class='small'>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_flour.png'/><p>Buckwheat flour is made from ground buckwheat groats. It is often used partially in recipes with wheat flour. Use buckwheat flour for making buckwheat pancakes, noodles, and as a replacement for wheat flour in baked goods. As buckwheat contains no gluten, it may be eaten by people with gluten-related disorders.</p><h2>buckwheat groats</h2><p class='small'>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/buckwheat_groats.html b/site/buckwheat_groats.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat groats</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat groats</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><p>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat groats</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat groats</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><p>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/buckwheat_noodles.html b/site/buckwheat_noodles.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat noodles</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat noodles</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_noodles.png'/><p>Buckwheat noodles are popular in Japan and Korea, the difficulty of making noodles from flour with no gluten has resulted in a traditional art developed around their manufacture by hand. in Japan, they are made from buckwheat flour (juwari 十割), or a combination of buckwheat and wheat flours (nihachi soba 二八). Depending on the shop, the percentage of buckwheat flour in soba noodles typically ranges between 40 percent and 100 percent.</p><h2>buckwheat groats</h2><p class='small'>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat noodles</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>buckwheat noodles</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_noodles.png'/><p>Buckwheat noodles are popular in Japan and Korea, the difficulty of making noodles from flour with no gluten has resulted in a traditional art developed around their manufacture by hand. in Japan, they are made from buckwheat flour (juwari 十割), or a combination of buckwheat and wheat flours (nihachi soba 二八). Depending on the shop, the percentage of buckwheat flour in soba noodles typically ranges between 40 percent and 100 percent.</p><h2>buckwheat groats</h2><p class='small'>Buckwheat groats come from the buckwheat plant, or <b>Fagopyrum esculentum</b>. Buckwheat is not a wheat, but a 'pseudocereal' that is related to sorrel, knotweed and rhubarb. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked. Buckwheat groats have a rich, nutty flavor, and are a good source of <b>zinc</b> and of the protein <b>lysine</b>.<br /><br />The groats can be processed into flour, made into beer, roasted and brewed as tea to make soba-cha <b>そば茶</b> and cooked like rice.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/buckwheat_tea.html b/site/buckwheat_tea.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat tea</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>buckwheat tea</h1><h2>1 teapot — 15 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/buckwheat_tea.jpg'/><p class='col2'>A friend from Japan gave us some soba cha <b>そば茶</b> last month, it's something we've had before but that we never thought of making ourselves. It's a type of tea that is served in some soba shops, as a companion drink to buckwheat noodles. It has a subtle nutty flavor, and is perfect to drink after dinner or later at night as it doesn't have any caffeine.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/buckwheat_tea_1.jpg'><br /><br /> I like to roast the groats as I need them, but it's possible to prepare a larger batch ahead of time. The roasted buckwheat groats will store for a few months if kept in a cool and dry place. <br /><br /><b>Roasting a larger batch:</b> When roasting a larger batch, use a larger pan so that the groats don't sit atop of each other. The groats must be in a single layer so they can cook evenly.<br /><br /> <b>Re-using the softened groats:</b> It's possible to re-use the softened groats by pouring more water onto them, although the flavor will not be as strong. If you like to minimize food waste, it's possible to incorporate the soft groats in other meals. For example, you can mix it into rice, cookies, breads etc.<br /><br /> <b>Cooking groats using oven:</b> You can roast your buckwheat groats in your oven. Roast them at 180C for 50 minutes, while stirring on occasion.</p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>roasting</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_groats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><b>buckwheat groats</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Bring a pan to medium heat, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='buckwheat_groats'>raw buckwheat groats</a>. </li><li>Toast the buckwheat_groats until they're fragrant and lightly browned, all while stirring constantly. Do this for about <u>5 minutes</u>. Then, lower the heat and continue to toast the groats until they turn a deep brown color (~5 minutes, depending on the temperature of the pan). Continue stirring, and watch them so they don't burn. </li><li>Transfer to a bowl, let cool. </li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>infusion</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_groats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><b>buckwheat groats</b> <u>2 tbsp, roasted</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>250ml, hot</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='buckwheat_groats'>roasted buckwheat groats</a> into the tea strainer of a teapot, and pour <i>3 cups</i> of hot water overtop. Let tea infuse for <u>5-10 minutes</u>.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — buckwheat tea</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>buckwheat tea</h1><h2>1 teapot — 15 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/buckwheat_tea.jpg'/><p class='col2'>A friend from Japan gave us some soba cha <b>そば茶</b> last month, it's something we've had before but that we never thought of making ourselves. It's a type of tea that is served in some soba shops, as a companion drink to buckwheat noodles. It has a subtle nutty flavor, and is perfect to drink after dinner or later at night as it doesn't have any caffeine.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/buckwheat_tea_1.jpg'><br /><br /> I like to roast the groats as I need them, but it's possible to prepare a larger batch ahead of time. The roasted buckwheat groats will store for a few months if kept in a cool and dry place. <br /><br /><b>Roasting a larger batch:</b> When roasting a larger batch, use a larger pan so that the groats don't sit atop of each other. The groats must be in a single layer so they can cook evenly.<br /><br /> <b>Re-using the softened groats:</b> It's possible to re-use the softened groats by pouring more water onto them, although the flavor will not be as strong. If you like to minimize food waste, it's possible to incorporate the soft groats in other meals. For example, you can mix it into rice, cookies, breads etc.<br /><br /> <b>Cooking groats using oven:</b> You can roast your buckwheat groats in your oven. Roast them at 180C for 50 minutes, while stirring on occasion.</p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>roasting</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_groats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><b>buckwheat groats</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Bring a pan to medium heat, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='buckwheat_groats'>raw buckwheat groats</a>. </li><li>Toast the buckwheat_groats until they're fragrant and lightly browned, all while stirring constantly. Do this for about <u>5 minutes</u>. Then, lower the heat and continue to toast the groats until they turn a deep brown color (~5 minutes, depending on the temperature of the pan). Continue stirring, and watch them so they don't burn. </li><li>Transfer to a bowl, let cool. </li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>infusion</h3><dt><a href='buckwheat_groats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/buckwheat_groats.png'/><b>buckwheat groats</b> <u>2 tbsp, roasted</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>250ml, hot</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='buckwheat_groats'>roasted buckwheat groats</a> into the tea strainer of a teapot, and pour <i>3 cups</i> of hot water overtop. Let tea infuse for <u>5-10 minutes</u>.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/bull_kelp_powder.html b/site/bull_kelp_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bull kelp powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bull kelp powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bull_kelp_powder.png'/><p>Nereocystis a genus of brown kelp containing the species <b>Nereocystis luetkeana</b>. Some common names include edible kelp, bull kelp, bullwhip kelp, ribbon kelp, bladder wrack. Bull kelp powder is made from dried bull kelp, and is one of the tastiest seaweeds. It is used as a seasoning to create a briny taste.</p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — bull kelp powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>bull kelp powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/bull_kelp_powder.png'/><p>Nereocystis a genus of brown kelp containing the species <b>Nereocystis luetkeana</b>. Some common names include edible kelp, bull kelp, bullwhip kelp, ribbon kelp, bladder wrack. Bull kelp powder is made from dried bull kelp, and is one of the tastiest seaweeds. It is used as a seasoning to create a briny taste.</p><h2>seaweed</h2><p class='small'>There are 3 main groups of edible seaweed: Red algea, green algea and brown algea. Most edible seaweeds are marine algae whereas most freshwater algae are toxic. Seaweed contains high levels of <b>iodine</b> and <b>calcium</b>. It is possibly a source of <b>vitamin B12</b> (see <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042564/' target='_blank'>ref</a>), but the amount is variable and therefore, not dependable.<br /><br />Because it comes from the sea, seaweed contains sodium. It should be avoided by anyone on a sodium-restricted diet. <a href='wakame.html'>Wakame</a> has the highest sodium content, with <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>kelp</a> and laver having significantly less.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/burmese_tofu.html b/site/burmese_tofu.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — burmese tofu</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>burmese tofu</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/burmese_tofu.png'/><p>Burmese tofu is not made from <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, but with besan (chickpea) flour. It's made in a way that is similar to polenta, by mixing flour with water, turmeric and salt. Burmese tofu is yellow, with a jelly texture that doesn't crumbled when cut or sliced. Burmese tofu can be fried, eaten in salads, curried etc. It is also used as an alternative to tofu for individuals who are sensitive to soy products.<br /><br /></p><h2>chickpeas</h2><p class='small'>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — burmese tofu</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>burmese tofu</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/burmese_tofu.png'/><p>Burmese tofu is not made from <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, but with besan (chickpea) flour. It's made in a way that is similar to polenta, by mixing flour with water, turmeric and salt. Burmese tofu is yellow, with a jelly texture that doesn't crumbled when cut or sliced. Burmese tofu can be fried, eaten in salads, curried etc. It is also used as an alternative to tofu for individuals who are sensitive to soy products.<br /><br /></p><h2>chickpeas</h2><p class='small'>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/button_mushrooms.html b/site/button_mushrooms.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — button mushrooms</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>button mushrooms</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/button_mushrooms.png'/><p>Button mushrooms, or <b>Agaricus bisporus</b>, are small immature <a href='portobello_mushrooms.html'>portobello mushrooms</a>. They are white in color. Most button mushrooms are picked and sold when they are young, with their caps closed. The whole mushrooms is often used is recipes, stem included. To prepare button mushrooms, wipe them gently to remove dirt. They can be found in the wild, but can easily be confused with <b>A. Californicus</b>, a look-alike that is mildly toxic.<br /><br /></p><h2>mushroom</h2><p class='small'>Mushrooms are the fleshy fruiting body of a fungus. They grow above ground, soil or from a food source. UV ray-treated (due to both sunlight and articial UV light tech) mushrooms are a source of <b>vitamin d2</b>. Many mushrooms are poisonous, resembling certain edible species. Gathering mushrooms in the wild is risky for the inexperienced and should only be undertaken by persons knowledgeable in mushroom identification.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — button mushrooms</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>button mushrooms</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/button_mushrooms.png'/><p>Button mushrooms, or <b>Agaricus bisporus</b>, are small immature <a href='portobello_mushrooms.html'>portobello mushrooms</a>. They are white in color. Most button mushrooms are picked and sold when they are young, with their caps closed. The whole mushrooms is often used is recipes, stem included. To prepare button mushrooms, wipe them gently to remove dirt. They can be found in the wild, but can easily be confused with <b>A. Californicus</b>, a look-alike that is mildly toxic.<br /><br /></p><h2>mushroom</h2><p class='small'>Mushrooms are the fleshy fruiting body of a fungus. They grow above ground, soil or from a food source. UV ray-treated (due to both sunlight and articial UV light tech) mushrooms are a source of <b>vitamin d2</b>. Many mushrooms are poisonous, resembling certain edible species. Gathering mushrooms in the wild is risky for the inexperienced and should only be undertaken by persons knowledgeable in mushroom identification.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/canola_oil.html b/site/canola_oil.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — canola oil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>canola oil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><p>Canola oil is a good source of Omega-3's, it is derived from a variety of rapeseed. Canola oil has many non food uses, it is used in candles, lipsticks, inks etcCanola oil, as is the case for most cooking oils, isn't essential to good health and should be used sparingly.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — canola oil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>canola oil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><p>Canola oil is a good source of Omega-3's, it is derived from a variety of rapeseed. Canola oil has many non food uses, it is used in candles, lipsticks, inks etcCanola oil, as is the case for most cooking oils, isn't essential to good health and should be used sparingly.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/carob.html b/site/carob.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carob</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carob</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carob.png'/><p>The carob, or <b>Ceratonia siliqua</b>, is a tree in the legume family <b>Fabaceae</b>. It is cultivated for its edible pods, which when ripe, are sometimes dried, toasted and ground into carob powder. Carob pods are sweet, not bitter, and contain no theobromine or caffeine.<br /><br />They are non-toxic to animals because they lack <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobromine' target='_blank'>theobromine</a>. Carob seeds is the base ingredients for the product of locus bean gum, a thickening agent used in the food industry.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carob</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carob</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carob.png'/><p>The carob, or <b>Ceratonia siliqua</b>, is a tree in the legume family <b>Fabaceae</b>. It is cultivated for its edible pods, which when ripe, are sometimes dried, toasted and ground into carob powder. Carob pods are sweet, not bitter, and contain no theobromine or caffeine.<br /><br />They are non-toxic to animals because they lack <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobromine' target='_blank'>theobromine</a>. Carob seeds is the base ingredients for the product of locus bean gum, a thickening agent used in the food industry.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/carob_chips.html b/site/carob_chips.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carob chips</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carob chips</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carob_chips.png'/><p>Carob chips are the dried, toasted form of <a href='carob.html'>carob</a> pods.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carob chips</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carob chips</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carob_chips.png'/><p>Carob chips are the dried, toasted form of <a href='carob.html'>carob</a> pods.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu.html b/site/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carrot kinpira onigirazu</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>carrot kinpira onigirazu</h1><h2>4 servings — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu.jpg'/><p class='col2'>An onigirazu is a Japanese rice ball sandwich, or a 'lazy onigiri'.<br /><br />The word onigiri (or nigiru) means to press into shape using your hands, while "razu" means the opposite. Free form onigiri! This is perfect for people who have a hard time making rice balls, as is the case for me. Onigirazu has the same great taste, without the fear of imperfection.<br /><br />This recipe is perfect when you don't have the right type of rice available for onigiri. You can use just about any type, I tested it out a few different kinds. The seaweed wrapping will keep it together, thus eliminating the need for sticky rice.<br /><br />The rice was seasoned with miso for added flavour, and was filled with carrot 'kinpira' — 'Kinpira' means "sauteed" (usually with a mixture of mirin soy sauce and chili peppers.) It's a sweet and spicy dish that is often served in bentos.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu_2.jpg'/><br /><br />You should try and make your own version of onigirazu at home! As I said, it's no-fail.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>kinpira carrot</h3><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='mirin.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/mirin.png'/><b>mirin</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Peel and cut <i>2 large</i> <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a> into thin strips.</li><li>Stir these ingredients together to make the sauce for the kinpira - <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>, <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='mirin.html'>mirin</a> and <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a>.</li><li>Heat <u>1 tbsp</u> of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a> in a pan at medium heat, add the carrot strips and cook for <u>2-3 minutes</u>. Stir in <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> as well as the sauce prepared in the previous step.</li><li>Cook until no liquid remains. Let cool.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>rice</h3><dt><a href='short_grain_white_rice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/short_grain_white_rice.png'/><b>short grain white rice</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_miso.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_miso.png'/><b>white miso</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 1/2 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Dissolve <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='white_miso.html'>white miso</a> in <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> and pour into pot with <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='short_grain_white_rice.html'>short grain white rice</a> (first, wash the rice until water runs clear).</li><li>Bring to a boil. Once it starts to bubble up lower to a simmer, cover and cook for <u>5-10 minutes</u> or until all of the liquid has been absorbed.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>wrapper</h3><dt><a href='nori_sheets.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/nori_sheets.png'/><b>nori sheets</b> <u>4</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Lay out <i>4 pieces</i> of <a href='nori_sheets.html'>nori sheets</a>, rough side up. Lay out some rice in the center of the 4 sheets, then divide the carrot kinpira into 4 portions and lay over the rice. Cover the carrots with the remaining rice.</li><li>Now, take one corner of the nori sheet and fold over into the middle, do the same for the opposing corner. Then, repeat for the other 2 corners. Press down gently.</li><li>Wait until the nori has softened and then cut into the middle! Serve as is.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carrot kinpira onigirazu</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>carrot kinpira onigirazu</h1><h2>4 servings — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu.jpg'/><p class='col2'>An onigirazu is a Japanese rice ball sandwich, or a 'lazy onigiri'.<br /><br />The word onigiri (or nigiru) means to press into shape using your hands, while "razu" means the opposite. Free form onigiri! This is perfect for people who have a hard time making rice balls, as is the case for me. Onigirazu has the same great taste, without the fear of imperfection.<br /><br />This recipe is perfect when you don't have the right type of rice available for onigiri. You can use just about any type, I tested it out a few different kinds. The seaweed wrapping will keep it together, thus eliminating the need for sticky rice.<br /><br />The rice was seasoned with miso for added flavour, and was filled with carrot 'kinpira' — 'Kinpira' means "sauteed" (usually with a mixture of mirin soy sauce and chili peppers.) It's a sweet and spicy dish that is often served in bentos.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/carrot_kinpira_onigirazu_2.jpg'/><br /><br />You should try and make your own version of onigirazu at home! As I said, it's no-fail.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>kinpira carrot</h3><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>2</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='mirin.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/mirin.png'/><b>mirin</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Peel and cut <i>2 large</i> <a href='carrot.html'>carrot</a> into thin strips.</li><li>Stir these ingredients together to make the sauce for the kinpira - <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>, <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='mirin.html'>mirin</a> and <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a>.</li><li>Heat <u>1 tbsp</u> of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a> in a pan at medium heat, add the carrot strips and cook for <u>2-3 minutes</u>. Stir in <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> as well as the sauce prepared in the previous step.</li><li>Cook until no liquid remains. Let cool.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>rice</h3><dt><a href='short_grain_white_rice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/short_grain_white_rice.png'/><b>short grain white rice</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_miso.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_miso.png'/><b>white miso</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 1/2 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Dissolve <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='white_miso.html'>white miso</a> in <i>1 1/2 cups</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> and pour into pot with <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='short_grain_white_rice.html'>short grain white rice</a> (first, wash the rice until water runs clear).</li><li>Bring to a boil. Once it starts to bubble up lower to a simmer, cover and cook for <u>5-10 minutes</u> or until all of the liquid has been absorbed.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>wrapper</h3><dt><a href='nori_sheets.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/nori_sheets.png'/><b>nori sheets</b> <u>4</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Lay out <i>4 pieces</i> of <a href='nori_sheets.html'>nori sheets</a>, rough side up. Lay out some rice in the center of the 4 sheets, then divide the carrot kinpira into 4 portions and lay over the rice. Cover the carrots with the remaining rice.</li><li>Now, take one corner of the nori sheet and fold over into the middle, do the same for the opposing corner. Then, repeat for the other 2 corners. Press down gently.</li><li>Wait until the nori has softened and then cut into the middle! Serve as is.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/carrots.html b/site/carrots.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carrots</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carrots</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><p>Carrots contain high quantities of vitamin A. Carrot cultivars can be grouped into two broad classes, <b>eastern carrots</b> (purple, yellow, often with branched roots) and <b>western carrots</b> (with an abundance of carotene). Carrots benefit from companion plants. Onions, leeks and chives for instance help repel the carrot root fly. Carrots can be stored for many months in a refrigerator, or in moist, cool places in winter. For long-term storage, carrots can be stashed in a bucket between layers of sand. A storage temperature of 0 to 5 °C is ideal.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — carrots</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>carrots</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><p>Carrots contain high quantities of vitamin A. Carrot cultivars can be grouped into two broad classes, <b>eastern carrots</b> (purple, yellow, often with branched roots) and <b>western carrots</b> (with an abundance of carotene). Carrots benefit from companion plants. Onions, leeks and chives for instance help repel the carrot root fly. Carrots can be stored for many months in a refrigerator, or in moist, cool places in winter. For long-term storage, carrots can be stashed in a bucket between layers of sand. A storage temperature of 0 to 5 °C is ideal.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cassava.html b/site/cassava.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cassava</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cassava</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cassava.png'/><p>Cassava</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cassava</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cassava</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cassava.png'/><p>Cassava</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cauliflower.html b/site/cauliflower.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cauliflower</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cauliflower</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cauliflower.png'/><p>Cauliflower is one of many vegetables of the species <b>Brassica olerancea</b> in the genus <b>Brassica</a>. Typically, only the head is eaten. There are <a href='white_cauliflower.html'>white</a>, green, yellow and <a href='purple_cauliflower.html'>purple</a> varieties of cauliflower. Cauliflower is high in <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>. Eating ½ cup of cauliflower has been shown to <a href='https://www.theveganrd.com/vegan-nutrition-101/vegan-nutrition-primers/iron-a-vegan-nutrition-primer/' target='_blank'>increase iron absorption</a> from plant foods by as much as 4-6 times.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cauliflower</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cauliflower</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cauliflower.png'/><p>Cauliflower is one of many vegetables of the species <b>Brassica olerancea</b> in the genus <b>Brassica</a>. Typically, only the head is eaten. There are <a href='white_cauliflower.html'>white</a>, green, yellow and <a href='purple_cauliflower.html'>purple</a> varieties of cauliflower. Cauliflower is high in <a href='nutrition.html#vitamin-c'>vitamin C</a>. Eating ½ cup of cauliflower has been shown to <a href='https://www.theveganrd.com/vegan-nutrition-101/vegan-nutrition-primers/iron-a-vegan-nutrition-primer/' target='_blank'>increase iron absorption</a> from plant foods by as much as 4-6 times.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cavatappi.html b/site/cavatappi.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cavatappi</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cavatappi</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cavatappi.png'/><p>Cavatappi — also known as cellentani, scoobi-doo, amori, spirali, or tortiglione — noodles, are a type of thick, corkscrew-shaped tubes of pasta. They hold chunky sauces well, and work well in baked dishes. .</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cavatappi</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cavatappi</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cavatappi.png'/><p>Cavatappi — also known as cellentani, scoobi-doo, amori, spirali, or tortiglione — noodles, are a type of thick, corkscrew-shaped tubes of pasta. They hold chunky sauces well, and work well in baked dishes. .</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cayenne_pepper.html b/site/cayenne_pepper.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cayenne pepper</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cayenne pepper</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper.png'/><p>Cayenne pepper is a type of <b>Capsicum annuum</b>, a moderately hot chili pepper.</p><h2>chili peppers</h2><p class='small'>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cayenne pepper</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cayenne pepper</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper.png'/><p>Cayenne pepper is a type of <b>Capsicum annuum</b>, a moderately hot chili pepper.</p><h2>chili peppers</h2><p class='small'>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cayenne_pepper_powder.html b/site/cayenne_pepper_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cayenne pepper powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cayenne pepper powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><p>Cayenne peppers are generally dried and ground to make cayenne powder, although it may be a blend of different types of peppers, quite often not containing cayenne peppers, and may or may not contain the seeds.</p><h2>cayenne pepper</h2><p class='small'>Cayenne pepper is a type of <b>Capsicum annuum</b>, a moderately hot chili pepper.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cayenne pepper powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cayenne pepper powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><p>Cayenne peppers are generally dried and ground to make cayenne powder, although it may be a blend of different types of peppers, quite often not containing cayenne peppers, and may or may not contain the seeds.</p><h2>cayenne pepper</h2><p class='small'>Cayenne pepper is a type of <b>Capsicum annuum</b>, a moderately hot chili pepper.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cheese.html b/site/cheese.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cheese</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>cheese</h1><h2>2 servings — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/cheese.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I used to have a cheese recipe on this website, but it failed me a few times after making it, which made it a poor recipe indeed. This time, I've experiemented a lot more, removing and adding ingredients.<br /><br />This is a basic cheese recipe, that you can add onto if you want different flavors. It's simple to prepare, and ready under an hour. Another great thing about it is that it's completely nut-free!<br /><br />This cheese can be grated, it holds its shape well enough so it can be used as a topping on pizza — yay!<br /><br />In this recipe I use <a href='kanten.html'>kanten</a>, which is similar to <a href='agar_agar.html'>agar agar</a> except that it's made from a different type of red algae (tengusa). It can be swapped 1:1 in a recipe, although the resulting texture will not be the same. Adding agar agar will make the cheese softer, so I highly recommend using kanten if available.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/cheese_1.jpg'/><br /><br /><b>Flavors</b><br /><br />For a pepper jack cheese flavor, add <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a>, <a href='onion_powder.html'>onion powder</a> and <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a>. You can also add <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a>, for a bit of spice, or <a href='pimento_olives.html'>pimento olives</a>!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>cheese</h3><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='nutritional_yeast.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/nutritional_yeast.png'/><b>nutritional yeast</b> <u>4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tahini.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tahini.png'/><b>tahini</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='onion_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/onion_powder.png'/><b>onion powder</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_miso.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_miso.png'/><b>white miso</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='kanten_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/kanten_powder.png'/><b>kanten powder</b> <u>1 generous tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a bowl, mix <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, <i>4 tbsp</i> of <a href='nutritional_yeast.html'>nutritional yeast</a>, <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='tahini.html'>tahini</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='white_miso.html'>white miso</a>.</li><li>Heat a saucepan at medium heat, pour <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a> and sprinkle <i>1 generous tsp</i> of <a href='kanten_powder.html'>kanten powder</a>. Stir <a href='kanten_powder.html'>kanten powder</a> into the milk.</li><li>When content starts to boil, lower to a simmer and add the bowl of mixed ingredients into it. Stir, for <u>a minute or two</u> and then pour contents of pan into two small bowls. The reason I use two instead of one, is because the cheese will harden quicker.</li><li>Let mixture rest for <u>1 hour or so, 2 is better</u> (especially if it's hot where you are).</li><li>Flip bowls upside down, scoop out cheese and enjoy! This cheese can be grated onto pizza too!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cheese</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>cheese</h1><h2>2 servings — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/cheese.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I used to have a cheese recipe on this website, but it failed me a few times after making it, which made it a poor recipe indeed. This time, I've experiemented a lot more, removing and adding ingredients.<br /><br />This is a basic cheese recipe, that you can add onto if you want different flavors. It's simple to prepare, and ready under an hour. Another great thing about it is that it's completely nut-free!<br /><br />This cheese can be grated, it holds its shape well enough so it can be used as a topping on pizza — yay!<br /><br />In this recipe I use <a href='kanten.html'>kanten</a>, which is similar to <a href='agar_agar.html'>agar agar</a> except that it's made from a different type of red algae (tengusa). It can be swapped 1:1 in a recipe, although the resulting texture will not be the same. Adding agar agar will make the cheese softer, so I highly recommend using kanten if available.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/cheese_1.jpg'/><br /><br /><b>Flavors</b><br /><br />For a pepper jack cheese flavor, add <a href='garlic.html'>garlic</a>, <a href='onion_powder.html'>onion powder</a> and <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a>. You can also add <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a>, for a bit of spice, or <a href='pimento_olives.html'>pimento olives</a>!<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>cheese</h3><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='nutritional_yeast.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/nutritional_yeast.png'/><b>nutritional yeast</b> <u>4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tahini.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tahini.png'/><b>tahini</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='onion_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/onion_powder.png'/><b>onion powder</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='white_miso.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/white_miso.png'/><b>white miso</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='kanten_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/kanten_powder.png'/><b>kanten powder</b> <u>1 generous tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>In a bowl, mix <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, <i>4 tbsp</i> of <a href='nutritional_yeast.html'>nutritional yeast</a>, <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='tahini.html'>tahini</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='white_miso.html'>white miso</a>.</li><li>Heat a saucepan at medium heat, pour <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a> and sprinkle <i>1 generous tsp</i> of <a href='kanten_powder.html'>kanten powder</a>. Stir <a href='kanten_powder.html'>kanten powder</a> into the milk.</li><li>When content starts to boil, lower to a simmer and add the bowl of mixed ingredients into it. Stir, for <u>a minute or two</u> and then pour contents of pan into two small bowls. The reason I use two instead of one, is because the cheese will harden quicker.</li><li>Let mixture rest for <u>1 hour or so, 2 is better</u> (especially if it's hot where you are).</li><li>Flip bowls upside down, scoop out cheese and enjoy! This cheese can be grated onto pizza too!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chia_seeds.html b/site/chia_seeds.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chia seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chia seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chia_seeds.png'/><p>Chia seeds are the edible seeds of <b>Salvia hispanica</b>, a flowering plant belonging to the mint family. They are small, oval, grey/white/black seeds. Chia seeds are a source of <b>Omega-3's</b>.<br /><br />Chia seeds are <b>hydrophilic</b>, meaning that they can absorb up to 12x their weight in liquid. Soaking the seeds creates a thick, gluey coating that gives it a gel-like texture.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chia seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chia seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chia_seeds.png'/><p>Chia seeds are the edible seeds of <b>Salvia hispanica</b>, a flowering plant belonging to the mint family. They are small, oval, grey/white/black seeds. Chia seeds are a source of <b>Omega-3's</b>.<br /><br />Chia seeds are <b>hydrophilic</b>, meaning that they can absorb up to 12x their weight in liquid. Soaking the seeds creates a thick, gluey coating that gives it a gel-like texture.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chickpea_flour.html b/site/chickpea_flour.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpea flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chickpea flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chickpea_flour.png'/><p>Chickpea flour — also known as <b>besan</b>, <b>Channa dal</b> or <b>gram</b> flour — is made from ground raw or roasted chickpeas. Roasted varieties has more flavor, while the raw variety is bitter. Chickpea flour has a higher <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a> content than other flours.<br /><br />This type of flour has a long shelf life due to the low-moisture and low-fat content. Chickpea flour has a texture and taste that is ideal for <a href='okonomiyaki.html'>savoury pancakes</a> or <a href='scrambled_chickpeas.html'>faux-omelettes</a>. When mixed with an equal volume of water, it can be used as an egg replacement in vegan cooking.<br /><br /></p><h2>chickpeas</h2><p class='small'>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpea flour</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chickpea flour</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chickpea_flour.png'/><p>Chickpea flour — also known as <b>besan</b>, <b>Channa dal</b> or <b>gram</b> flour — is made from ground raw or roasted chickpeas. Roasted varieties has more flavor, while the raw variety is bitter. Chickpea flour has a higher <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a> content than other flours.<br /><br />This type of flour has a long shelf life due to the low-moisture and low-fat content. Chickpea flour has a texture and taste that is ideal for <a href='okonomiyaki.html'>savoury pancakes</a> or <a href='scrambled_chickpeas.html'>faux-omelettes</a>. When mixed with an equal volume of water, it can be used as an egg replacement in vegan cooking.<br /><br /></p><h2>chickpeas</h2><p class='small'>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chickpea_salad_sandwich.html b/site/chickpea_salad_sandwich.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpea salad sandwich</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chickpea salad sandwich</h1><h2>4 portions — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chickpea_salad_sandwich.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Sidney, BC. Canada.<br /><br />I recently ordered ingredients from BC Kelp, a company in northern Canada that grows their own seaweed. A lot of the food I make these days has either nori, wakame, bull kelp or bladderwack whole tips in it.<br /><br />I'd like to see more people cooking with sea vegetables. You can snack on dried seaweed, or add it to soups and salads. The powdered version I'm using in this recipe, adds a lot of umami and color to meals.<br /><br />You can order your own bull kelp powder from the <a href='http://www.bckelp.com/index.html' target='_blank'>BC Kelp website</a>, they have a wide range of quality seaweed to choose from.<br /><br /><b>Recommendations</b><br /><br />Adding a bay leaf, a bit of onion or a clove or two of garlic to the cooking water add a subtle seasoning to the chickpeas and boost flavor.<br /><br /><b>Substitutions</b><br /><br />If you don't have access to <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>bull kelp powder</a>, you can use 1 tsp capers or dulse flakes. These needs to be added to create a briny no-tuna taste.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>chickpea salad</h3><dt><a href='chickpeas.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chickpeas.png'/><b>chickpeas</b> <u>15oz, cooked</u></a></dt><dt><a href='veganaise.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/veganaise.png'/><b>veganaise</b> <u>3-4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='dijon_mustard.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/dijon_mustard.png'/><b>dijon mustard</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bull_kelp_powder.png'/><b>bull kelp powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='scallions.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/scallions.png'/><b>scallions</b> <u>2 stalks</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='shichimi_togarashi.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/shichimi_togarashi.png'/><b>shichimi togarashi</b> <u>To taste</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>For veganaise, see the <a href='#homemade_veganaise.html'>recipe</a>.</li><li>Cook <i>3/4 cup</i> of dried <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> (see <a href='#chickpeas.html'>instructions</a>), or use 1 can (15oz).</li><li>Mix the cooked <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> with <i>3-4 tbsp</i> of <a href='#homemade_veganaise.html'>venagaise</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> <a href='dijon_mustard.html'>dijon mustard</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>bull kelp powder</a>, <i>2 stalks</i> of chopped <a href='scallions.html'>scallions</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>.</li><li>Season with <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a> and <a href='shichimi_togarashi.html'>shichimi togarashi</a>, and serve over toasted bread.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpea salad sandwich</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chickpea salad sandwich</h1><h2>4 portions — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chickpea_salad_sandwich.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Sidney, BC. Canada.<br /><br />I recently ordered ingredients from BC Kelp, a company in northern Canada that grows their own seaweed. A lot of the food I make these days has either nori, wakame, bull kelp or bladderwack whole tips in it.<br /><br />I'd like to see more people cooking with sea vegetables. You can snack on dried seaweed, or add it to soups and salads. The powdered version I'm using in this recipe, adds a lot of umami and color to meals.<br /><br />You can order your own bull kelp powder from the <a href='http://www.bckelp.com/index.html' target='_blank'>BC Kelp website</a>, they have a wide range of quality seaweed to choose from.<br /><br /><b>Recommendations</b><br /><br />Adding a bay leaf, a bit of onion or a clove or two of garlic to the cooking water add a subtle seasoning to the chickpeas and boost flavor.<br /><br /><b>Substitutions</b><br /><br />If you don't have access to <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>bull kelp powder</a>, you can use 1 tsp capers or dulse flakes. These needs to be added to create a briny no-tuna taste.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>chickpea salad</h3><dt><a href='chickpeas.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chickpeas.png'/><b>chickpeas</b> <u>15oz, cooked</u></a></dt><dt><a href='veganaise.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/veganaise.png'/><b>veganaise</b> <u>3-4 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='dijon_mustard.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/dijon_mustard.png'/><b>dijon mustard</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bull_kelp_powder.png'/><b>bull kelp powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='scallions.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/scallions.png'/><b>scallions</b> <u>2 stalks</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='shichimi_togarashi.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/shichimi_togarashi.png'/><b>shichimi togarashi</b> <u>To taste</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>For veganaise, see the <a href='#homemade_veganaise.html'>recipe</a>.</li><li>Cook <i>3/4 cup</i> of dried <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> (see <a href='#chickpeas.html'>instructions</a>), or use 1 can (15oz).</li><li>Mix the cooked <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> with <i>3-4 tbsp</i> of <a href='#homemade_veganaise.html'>venagaise</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> <a href='dijon_mustard.html'>dijon mustard</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> <a href='bull_kelp_powder.html'>bull kelp powder</a>, <i>2 stalks</i> of chopped <a href='scallions.html'>scallions</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>.</li><li>Season with <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a> and <a href='shichimi_togarashi.html'>shichimi togarashi</a>, and serve over toasted bread.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chickpeas.html b/site/chickpeas.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpeas</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chickpeas</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chickpeas.png'/><p>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chickpeas</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chickpeas</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chickpeas.png'/><p>Chickpeas are the earliest cultivated legumes in history, and a staple in many countries. They are very rich in <a href='nutrition.html#protein'>protein</a>, and a good source of <a href='nutrition.html#iron'>iron</a>.<br /><br /> Chickpeas can be made into flour, they can be roasted, pureed, candied etc. It's a very versatile and inexpensive legume. The soaking liquid of chickpeas — <b>aquafaba</b> — can be used as an egg replacer in recipes.<br /><br />Dry chickpeas keep a long, long time. If you keep them in air-tight containers they will last even longer, because moisture and oxygen is the enemy of all beans. Oxygen makes the bean oils rancid overtime. You can store them for 5+ yrs if you add oxygen absorbers (packet consisting of powdered <b>iron oxide</b>) to the containers.<br /><br /><b>How to cook dried chickpeas</b><br /><br />Dried chickpeas triple in size when cooked (if not a little more). So 1 cup of dried chickpeas will make about 3 cups of cooked chickpeas. Dried chickpeas have a tough outer skin, and <b>should be soaked overnight</b>. Soaking them cuts down on cooking time, and in turn, saves energy. It also helps the beans cook more evenly and become tender all the way through. Another advantage to presoaking beans is that most of the gas-causing sugars are leeched out into the soaking water. So when you drain off the soaking water, you are also getting rid of this unpleasant side effect to eating beans. Next morning, drain and cook them in a pot or pressure cooker.<br /><br /><b>Stove top Pot:</b> Bring chickpeas to a boil, then lower to gentle simmer. Add salt when beans are almost cooked. In a pot, cooking them varies from 1-3 hours.<br /><br /><b>Pressure cooker:</b> Because beans cook differently depending on the kind, age, and whether or not they’ve been presoaked, quick-soaked or not soaked at all, there is no single all-encompasssing rule for pressure cooking beans. Having a good chart with all the variables to consult is important so that you can adjust to your circumstances. A good resource for this is <a href='https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/#beans' target='_blank'>Hip Pressure Cooking’s bean chart</a>. It’s a good idea to add 1 tbsp of neutral oil to the pot. Beans produce foam when cooking which can clog the pressure valve, and the oil will help to keep that down.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chili_pepper_flakes.html b/site/chili_pepper_flakes.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili pepper flakes</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chili pepper flakes</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><p>Chili pepper pods, which are berries, are used fresh or dried. Chilies are dried to preserve them for long periods of time. <a href='http://scottroberts.org/ultimate-guide-to-drying-hot-peppers/' target='_blank'>Dehydrated chiles</a> pack more fiery punch and ferocity in both solid food and hot sauce recipes than fresh peppers. If kept in a cool, dry place they should keep well for at least one year.</p><h2>chili peppers</h2><p class='small'>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili pepper flakes</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chili pepper flakes</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><p>Chili pepper pods, which are berries, are used fresh or dried. Chilies are dried to preserve them for long periods of time. <a href='http://scottroberts.org/ultimate-guide-to-drying-hot-peppers/' target='_blank'>Dehydrated chiles</a> pack more fiery punch and ferocity in both solid food and hot sauce recipes than fresh peppers. If kept in a cool, dry place they should keep well for at least one year.</p><h2>chili peppers</h2><p class='small'>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chili_peppers.html b/site/chili_peppers.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili peppers</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chili peppers</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chili_peppers.png'/><p>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili peppers</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chili peppers</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chili_peppers.png'/><p>Chili peppers, from Nahuatl <b>chīlli</b>, is the fruit of plants from the genus <b>Capsicum</b>. They're used in dishes to add heat or spice. There are many varieties of chili peppers, ranging in shape and color from white, yellow, red or purple to black. The 5 domesticated species are <b>Capsicum annuum</b>(bell peppers, cayenne etc), <b>Capsicum frutescens</b> (tabasco, thai etc), <b>Capsicum chinense</b> (habanero, naga etc), <b>Capsicum pubescens</b> (rocoto) and <b>Capsicum babbactum</b> (aji). The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin. The quantity of capsaicin varies by variety, and on growing conditions. The intensity of the "heat" of chili peppers is commonly reported in <a href='https://web.archive.org/web/20100823044606/http://www.tabasco.com/info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm' target='_blank'>Scoville heat units</a> (SHU).<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chili_pomegranate_brownies.html b/site/chili_pomegranate_brownies.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili pomegranate brownies</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chili pomegranate brownies</h1><h2>24 servings — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chili_pomegranate_brownies.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Making brownies has been on my mind for some time, I finally settled for <b>spicy brownies</b> with a sweet and spicy <b>pomegranate syrup</b>!<br /><br />I put a LOT of chili pepper flakes in these. I have a higher tolerance to it, but if you don't feel free to use less. You can omit the chilis in the batter, but I highly recommend infused the pomegranate syrup with some - it's delicious and won't be the same without it.<br /><br />These were a big success.<br /><br />I baked these brownies for Devine's birthday, and I've been re-making them ever since. You can vary the fruit juice for the topping, making reductions of fruit juices is very easy and it's so good, it makes desserts extra fancy without much effort. I cut them into 24 small squares, but these would look great in larger blocks too. Smaller portions means you can fool yourself into having some longer — I rather like that idea.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/chili.pomegranate_brownies_2.jpg'/><br /><br />In this recipe I substituted half of the fat for puréed pumpkin, you could also use apple sauce or banana (banana tastes is strong though). Know that when baking brownies, you can only substitute <b>half the amount</b> of fat before it effects the texture.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>brownies</h3><dt><a href='pumpkin.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pumpkin.png'/><b>pumpkin</b> <u>1/3 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>9 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>5 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cocoa_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_powder.png'/><b>cocoa powder</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>325F</u>.</li><li>Cut <i>1/3 cup</i> of <a href='pumpkin.html'>pumpkin</a>, steam until softened and process into a purée.</li><li>Put <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='ground_flax_seeds.html'>ground flax seeds</a> in a bowl with <i>9 tbsp</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, let thicken for <u>5 minutes</u>. Set aside.</li><li>Put <i>5 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>, <i>5 tbsp</i> of <a href='pumpkin_purée.html'>pumpkin purée</a>, <i>3/4 cup</i> <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a>, <i>3/4 cup</i> <a href='cocoa_powder.html'>cocoa powder</a> and a <i>1/4 tsp</i> <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> in a pan over medium to low heat. Stir until the <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> is melted, and all is well mixed.</li><li>Stir in the flax 'egg', as well as the <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>. Add <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> and mix well. Mixture should be very thick.</li><li>Pour into a 8X8 baking dish lined with parchment papper. Flatten with the back of a spoon to even it out and bake for <u>25 minutes</u>, or until knife comes out clean. Let cool. <i>Cut in 24 small squares</i>.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>syrup</h3><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='pomegranate_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pomegranate_juice.png'/><b>pomegranate juice</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Pour <i>2 cups</i> of <a href='pomegranate_juice.html'>unsweetened pomegranate juice</a> into a pot with <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>. Bring to a boil, lower to medium-high heat and leave for up to <u>1h</u> or until liquid has been reduced to <i>1 cup</i>.</li><li>Let cool, the syrup will thicken when cooled.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>topping</h3><dt><a href='pomegranate_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pomegranate_seeds.png'/><b>pomegranate seeds</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Top brownies with fresh <a href='pomegranate_seeds.html'>pomegranate seeds</a>, and drizzle with the chili-infused syrup!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chili pomegranate brownies</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chili pomegranate brownies</h1><h2>24 servings — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chili_pomegranate_brownies.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Making brownies has been on my mind for some time, I finally settled for <b>spicy brownies</b> with a sweet and spicy <b>pomegranate syrup</b>!<br /><br />I put a LOT of chili pepper flakes in these. I have a higher tolerance to it, but if you don't feel free to use less. You can omit the chilis in the batter, but I highly recommend infused the pomegranate syrup with some - it's delicious and won't be the same without it.<br /><br />These were a big success.<br /><br />I baked these brownies for Devine's birthday, and I've been re-making them ever since. You can vary the fruit juice for the topping, making reductions of fruit juices is very easy and it's so good, it makes desserts extra fancy without much effort. I cut them into 24 small squares, but these would look great in larger blocks too. Smaller portions means you can fool yourself into having some longer — I rather like that idea.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/chili.pomegranate_brownies_2.jpg'/><br /><br />In this recipe I substituted half of the fat for puréed pumpkin, you could also use apple sauce or banana (banana tastes is strong though). Know that when baking brownies, you can only substitute <b>half the amount</b> of fat before it effects the texture.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>brownies</h3><dt><a href='pumpkin.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pumpkin.png'/><b>pumpkin</b> <u>1/3 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>9 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='canola_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/canola_oil.png'/><b>canola oil</b> <u>5 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cocoa_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_powder.png'/><b>cocoa powder</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>325F</u>.</li><li>Cut <i>1/3 cup</i> of <a href='pumpkin.html'>pumpkin</a>, steam until softened and process into a purée.</li><li>Put <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='ground_flax_seeds.html'>ground flax seeds</a> in a bowl with <i>9 tbsp</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>, let thicken for <u>5 minutes</u>. Set aside.</li><li>Put <i>5 tbsp</i> of <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a>, <i>5 tbsp</i> of <a href='pumpkin_purée.html'>pumpkin purée</a>, <i>3/4 cup</i> <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a>, <i>3/4 cup</i> <a href='cocoa_powder.html'>cocoa powder</a> and a <i>1/4 tsp</i> <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> in a pan over medium to low heat. Stir until the <a href='canola_oil.html'>canola oil</a> is melted, and all is well mixed.</li><li>Stir in the flax 'egg', as well as the <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>. Add <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> and mix well. Mixture should be very thick.</li><li>Pour into a 8X8 baking dish lined with parchment papper. Flatten with the back of a spoon to even it out and bake for <u>25 minutes</u>, or until knife comes out clean. Let cool. <i>Cut in 24 small squares</i>.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>syrup</h3><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cayenne_pepper_powder.png'/><b>cayenne pepper powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='pomegranate_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pomegranate_juice.png'/><b>pomegranate juice</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Pour <i>2 cups</i> of <a href='pomegranate_juice.html'>unsweetened pomegranate juice</a> into a pot with <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='cayenne_pepper_powder.html'>cayenne pepper powder</a>. Bring to a boil, lower to medium-high heat and leave for up to <u>1h</u> or until liquid has been reduced to <i>1 cup</i>.</li><li>Let cool, the syrup will thicken when cooled.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>topping</h3><dt><a href='pomegranate_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pomegranate_seeds.png'/><b>pomegranate seeds</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Top brownies with fresh <a href='pomegranate_seeds.html'>pomegranate seeds</a>, and drizzle with the chili-infused syrup!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chives.html b/site/chives.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chives</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chives</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chives.png'/><p>Chives grow in clusters, with hollow leaves that come to a point. They have a mild onion flavor, which doesn't linger. They are a good source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Chives are used as a garnish, and as an aromatic herb. In cooking, it is best to add them at the end of the cooking process because they lose their flavor when heated. They have insect-repelling properties that can be ued in gardens to control pests. Chives can be stored in a bag in the refrigerator, if kept dry they will last up to a week.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chives</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chives</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chives.png'/><p>Chives grow in clusters, with hollow leaves that come to a point. They have a mild onion flavor, which doesn't linger. They are a good source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Chives are used as a garnish, and as an aromatic herb. In cooking, it is best to add them at the end of the cooking process because they lose their flavor when heated. They have insect-repelling properties that can be ued in gardens to control pests. Chives can be stored in a bag in the refrigerator, if kept dry they will last up to a week.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chocolate_chip_cookies.html b/site/chocolate_chip_cookies.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chocolate chip cookies</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chocolate chip cookies</h1><h2>12 — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chocolate_chip_cookies.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I've been making chocolate chips cookies for a while, but never thought it worthy of a recipe because there are so many online already. In the interest of posting absolute basic recipes though, I felt it deserved to be written down, especially because cookie chemistry is difficult. Slight differences in moisture content, altitude, fat content and sugar content can alter the look and texture of a cookie. There are reasons for the quantities and choice of each ingredient, all interact with each other to give cookies their sweet and soft texture.<br /><br />This recipe is a good base. Substitutions are possible, but changing ingredients — depending on the ingredient — can mess up your recipe. In my suggestions I give examples of good substitutions, and how to modify the recipe to get a good result.<b class='head'>Substitutions</b> <b>Flour:</b> If you choose to use spelt flour, a more nutritious alternative, add 1 tsp of baking powder to help it rise.<br /><br /><b>Fat:</b> The fat in cookies is a big part of their structure. I've added vegan butter as is behaves like actual butter, it helps create baked goods that are more tender by shortening gluten strands. When fat coats flour, it slows down the process of gluten formation creating a more tender product <a href='https://bakerbettie.com/function-of-butter-in-baking/#The_Function_of_Butter_in_Baking'>ref</a>. It's possible to make your own vegan butter, check out this <a href='https://www.forkandbeans.com/2015/07/11/vegan-butter-substitute'>recipe by fork and beans</a>.<br /><br /><b>Sugar:</b> Sugar is important in cookies, it helps with the flavor, color and texture. The oven temperature causes the sugar to react with the proteins, this is what gives baked goods their brown color. Brown sugar is important in this recipe, as it adds moisture to the dough. If you use 100% granulated sugar the cookie won't spread as well, not unless you add more moisture. You can sub granulated sugar with whole cane sugar or coconut sugar.<br /><br /><b>Add-ins:</b> If you have a sensitivity to caffeine use <a href='carob_chips'>carob chips</a> instead of chocolate chips. Switching to carob won't affect the cookies. <b class='head'>Troubleshooting</b>"I followed the recipe, but my cookies don't look the same as yours!" The quirkiness of different ovens makes it difficult to give accurate cooking times. Having a thermometer in your oven is the best way to read the temperature accurately.<br /><br /><b>Help! Cooking spreading too much!</b> If your cookie is spreading too much, you may have added too much sugar. Sugar is hygroscopic, it absorbs liquid but once it bakes it releases that and if there's too much, then it keeps spreading. Oven temperature is another factor. The hotter the oven, the more quickly the fat melts before the cookies have time to set. Depending on your oven, you may need to bake cookies longer but at a lower temperatures.<br /><br /><b>Help! Cookie not spreading!</b> One of the most common reasons why cookies don't spread is because there's too much flour in the dough. Try using less, 1/4 to 1/2 cup of flour, and consider increasing the brown sugar by a few tablespoons. This will add slightly more moisture and help the cookies spread. Be sure you're also using room temperature ingredients, especially butter, to promote the best spread and texture.<br /><br />Read more about <a href='https://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2016/03/14/cookie-chemistry-2'>cookie chemistry</a>. Recipe inspired from <a href='https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe'>this one</a>. </p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>cookie mix</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>6 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='brown_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><b>brown sugar</b> <u>6 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vegan_butter.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vegan_butter.png'/><b>vegan butter</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chocolate_chips.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chocolate_chips.png'/><b>chocolate chips</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Measure <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='vegan_butter.html'>vegan butter</a>. It should be slightly cooler than room temp.</li><li>Heat oven to <u>375F</u>.</li><li>In a small bowl, mix <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='flax_seeds'>ground flax seeds</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='water'>water</a>. This is your flax 'egg', let it thicken for <u>5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Mix <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_soda'>baking soda</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>.</li><li>In a bowl, cream <i>6 tbsp</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar'>granulated sugar</a>, <i>6 tbsp</i> of <a href='brown_sugar'>brown sugar</a> with <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='vegan_butter'>vegan butter</a> until well incorporated. Then add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and the flax egg. Mix again until smooth and creamy.</li><li>Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix well (but don't over do it).</li><li>Add <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='chocolate_chips.html'>chocolate chips</a>, distribute evenly.</li><li>Scoop up generous balls of dough and lay on a baking tray, leave plenty of room inbetween. </li><li>Bake cookies until they start to brown and crisp at the edges, depending on your oven this may take <u>10-15 minutes</u>. My oven is old and bakes at lower temperatures (and has no thermometer) so I need to bake them for the longer time. See notes in above description.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chocolate chip cookies</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>chocolate chip cookies</h1><h2>12 — 20 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/chocolate_chip_cookies.jpg'/><p class='col2'>I've been making chocolate chips cookies for a while, but never thought it worthy of a recipe because there are so many online already. In the interest of posting absolute basic recipes though, I felt it deserved to be written down, especially because cookie chemistry is difficult. Slight differences in moisture content, altitude, fat content and sugar content can alter the look and texture of a cookie. There are reasons for the quantities and choice of each ingredient, all interact with each other to give cookies their sweet and soft texture.<br /><br />This recipe is a good base. Substitutions are possible, but changing ingredients — depending on the ingredient — can mess up your recipe. In my suggestions I give examples of good substitutions, and how to modify the recipe to get a good result.<b class='head'>Substitutions</b> <b>Flour:</b> If you choose to use spelt flour, a more nutritious alternative, add 1 tsp of baking powder to help it rise.<br /><br /><b>Fat:</b> The fat in cookies is a big part of their structure. I've added vegan butter as is behaves like actual butter, it helps create baked goods that are more tender by shortening gluten strands. When fat coats flour, it slows down the process of gluten formation creating a more tender product <a href='https://bakerbettie.com/function-of-butter-in-baking/#The_Function_of_Butter_in_Baking'>ref</a>. It's possible to make your own vegan butter, check out this <a href='https://www.forkandbeans.com/2015/07/11/vegan-butter-substitute'>recipe by fork and beans</a>.<br /><br /><b>Sugar:</b> Sugar is important in cookies, it helps with the flavor, color and texture. The oven temperature causes the sugar to react with the proteins, this is what gives baked goods their brown color. Brown sugar is important in this recipe, as it adds moisture to the dough. If you use 100% granulated sugar the cookie won't spread as well, not unless you add more moisture. You can sub granulated sugar with whole cane sugar or coconut sugar.<br /><br /><b>Add-ins:</b> If you have a sensitivity to caffeine use <a href='carob_chips'>carob chips</a> instead of chocolate chips. Switching to carob won't affect the cookies. <b class='head'>Troubleshooting</b>"I followed the recipe, but my cookies don't look the same as yours!" The quirkiness of different ovens makes it difficult to give accurate cooking times. Having a thermometer in your oven is the best way to read the temperature accurately.<br /><br /><b>Help! Cooking spreading too much!</b> If your cookie is spreading too much, you may have added too much sugar. Sugar is hygroscopic, it absorbs liquid but once it bakes it releases that and if there's too much, then it keeps spreading. Oven temperature is another factor. The hotter the oven, the more quickly the fat melts before the cookies have time to set. Depending on your oven, you may need to bake cookies longer but at a lower temperatures.<br /><br /><b>Help! Cookie not spreading!</b> One of the most common reasons why cookies don't spread is because there's too much flour in the dough. Try using less, 1/4 to 1/2 cup of flour, and consider increasing the brown sugar by a few tablespoons. This will add slightly more moisture and help the cookies spread. Be sure you're also using room temperature ingredients, especially butter, to promote the best spread and texture.<br /><br />Read more about <a href='https://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2016/03/14/cookie-chemistry-2'>cookie chemistry</a>. Recipe inspired from <a href='https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe'>this one</a>. </p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>cookie mix</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/4 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='granulated_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/granulated_sugar.png'/><b>granulated sugar</b> <u>6 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='brown_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/brown_sugar.png'/><b>brown sugar</b> <u>6 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='vegan_butter.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/vegan_butter.png'/><b>vegan butter</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_milk.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_milk.png'/><b>soy milk</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apple_cider_vinegar.png'/><b>apple cider vinegar</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chocolate_chips.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chocolate_chips.png'/><b>chocolate chips</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Measure <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='vegan_butter.html'>vegan butter</a>. It should be slightly cooler than room temp.</li><li>Heat oven to <u>375F</u>.</li><li>In a small bowl, mix <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='flax_seeds'>ground flax seeds</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='water'>water</a>. This is your flax 'egg', let it thicken for <u>5 minutes</u>.</li><li>Mix <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='baking_soda'>baking soda</a> and <i>1/4 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>.</li><li>In a bowl, cream <i>6 tbsp</i> of <a href='granulated_sugar'>granulated sugar</a>, <i>6 tbsp</i> of <a href='brown_sugar'>brown sugar</a> with <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='vegan_butter'>vegan butter</a> until well incorporated. Then add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_milk.html'>soy milk</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='apple_cider_vinegar.html'>apple cider vinegar</a> and the flax egg. Mix again until smooth and creamy.</li><li>Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix well (but don't over do it).</li><li>Add <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='chocolate_chips.html'>chocolate chips</a>, distribute evenly.</li><li>Scoop up generous balls of dough and lay on a baking tray, leave plenty of room inbetween. </li><li>Bake cookies until they start to brown and crisp at the edges, depending on your oven this may take <u>10-15 minutes</u>. My oven is old and bakes at lower temperatures (and has no thermometer) so I need to bake them for the longer time. See notes in above description.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/chocolate_chips.html b/site/chocolate_chips.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chocolate chips</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chocolate chips</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chocolate_chips.png'/><p>Chocolate chips are small chunks of chocolate, made from roasted and ground <a href='cocoa_beans.html'>cocoa beans</a>. They often come in a teardrop shape, as flat discs or as square blocks. They were designed to retain their shape when baking, and therefore aren't a substitute for baking chocolate. Chocolate chips come unsweetened, semi-sweetened and sweetened.</p><h2>cocoa beans</h2><p class='small'>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — chocolate chips</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>chocolate chips</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/chocolate_chips.png'/><p>Chocolate chips are small chunks of chocolate, made from roasted and ground <a href='cocoa_beans.html'>cocoa beans</a>. They often come in a teardrop shape, as flat discs or as square blocks. They were designed to retain their shape when baking, and therefore aren't a substitute for baking chocolate. Chocolate chips come unsweetened, semi-sweetened and sweetened.</p><h2>cocoa beans</h2><p class='small'>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cinnamon.html b/site/cinnamon.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cinnamon</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cinnamon</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cinnamon.png'/><p>Cinnamon is an aromatic spice from the inner bark of many species of tree from the genus <b>Cinnamomum</b>. It's a flavouring additive used in both sweet and savoury dishes. It's sold in the form of quills or powdered. Cinnamon is a rich source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cinnamon</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cinnamon</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cinnamon.png'/><p>Cinnamon is an aromatic spice from the inner bark of many species of tree from the genus <b>Cinnamomum</b>. It's a flavouring additive used in both sweet and savoury dishes. It's sold in the form of quills or powdered. Cinnamon is a rich source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cocoa_beans.html b/site/cocoa_beans.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cocoa beans</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cocoa beans</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_beans.png'/><p>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cocoa beans</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cocoa beans</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_beans.png'/><p>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cocoa_powder.html b/site/cocoa_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cocoa powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cocoa powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_powder.png'/><p>Cocoa powder which is the dry powder made by grinding cocoa seeds and removing the cocoa butter from the cocoa solids, which are dark and bitter. The two basic types of cocoa powder are <b>Dutch processed</b> and <b>Broma processed</b>. Cocoa powder a source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Recipes specifically call out whether they require Dutch-process or unsweetened cocoa. It's not a good idea to swap out regular cocoa for Dutch cocoa or vice-versa. Dutch-process cocoa does not react with baking soda like regular cocoa does, so you should only use Dutch-process cocoa in those recipes that have baking powder (see <a href='https://www.huffpost.com/entry/unsweetened-vs-dutch-cocoa-powder_n_972395?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbi53aWtpcGVkaWEub3JnL3dpa2kvQnJvbWFfcHJvY2Vzcw&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAH1DFaQsw-T1c1SC1FaZBabMwbVXQ-BHNgG_19L6QijyflUYBgLug1DkfotIIc-TslE9MpvF9-mGqYMTRHlqz2Gy6iPuVPBtAGVOzKcxwGW0cggreoKl_ss_qlyMG2SSNjcMVGbjduavgUiXUTdrsSHcqiUvklahShVUXc44Q5wT' target='_blank'>ref</a>).<br /><br />The <b>Broma process</b> consists of hanging bags of roasted cocoa beans in a very warm room, above the melting point of cocoa butter (slightly above room temperature), and allowing the cocoa butter to drip off the beans, where it is collected, resulting in unsweetened cocoa that is dark brown, acidic and bitter. The <b>Dutch process</b> differs from the Broma process in that, after the cocoa butter has been drained off the beans as described above, the beans are then soaked in an alkaline solution to make them chemically neutral. Dutch process turns the cocoa a pale reddish brown and makes it chemically nonreactive.<br /><br /></p><h2>cocoa beans</h2><p class='small'>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cocoa powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cocoa powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cocoa_powder.png'/><p>Cocoa powder which is the dry powder made by grinding cocoa seeds and removing the cocoa butter from the cocoa solids, which are dark and bitter. The two basic types of cocoa powder are <b>Dutch processed</b> and <b>Broma processed</b>. Cocoa powder a source of <b>calcium</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />Recipes specifically call out whether they require Dutch-process or unsweetened cocoa. It's not a good idea to swap out regular cocoa for Dutch cocoa or vice-versa. Dutch-process cocoa does not react with baking soda like regular cocoa does, so you should only use Dutch-process cocoa in those recipes that have baking powder (see <a href='https://www.huffpost.com/entry/unsweetened-vs-dutch-cocoa-powder_n_972395?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbi53aWtpcGVkaWEub3JnL3dpa2kvQnJvbWFfcHJvY2Vzcw&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAH1DFaQsw-T1c1SC1FaZBabMwbVXQ-BHNgG_19L6QijyflUYBgLug1DkfotIIc-TslE9MpvF9-mGqYMTRHlqz2Gy6iPuVPBtAGVOzKcxwGW0cggreoKl_ss_qlyMG2SSNjcMVGbjduavgUiXUTdrsSHcqiUvklahShVUXc44Q5wT' target='_blank'>ref</a>).<br /><br />The <b>Broma process</b> consists of hanging bags of roasted cocoa beans in a very warm room, above the melting point of cocoa butter (slightly above room temperature), and allowing the cocoa butter to drip off the beans, where it is collected, resulting in unsweetened cocoa that is dark brown, acidic and bitter. The <b>Dutch process</b> differs from the Broma process in that, after the cocoa butter has been drained off the beans as described above, the beans are then soaked in an alkaline solution to make them chemically neutral. Dutch process turns the cocoa a pale reddish brown and makes it chemically nonreactive.<br /><br /></p><h2>cocoa beans</h2><p class='small'>Cocoa beans (also called cacao) are the dried and fermented seed of <b>Theobroma cacao</b>. The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, long and wide, ripening yellow to orange. The pod contains 20 to 60 seeds (or beans) embedded in a white pulp. Each seed contains a significant amount of fat (40–50 percent) as cocoa butter. The three main varieties of cocoa plant are <b>Forastero</b> (most common), <b>Criollo</b> (rarer, a delicacy), and <b>Trinitario</b>.<br /><br />Its seeds are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate. The fruit's active constituent is the stimulant <b>theobromine</b>, a compound similar to <a href='#coffee.html'>caffeine</a>.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coconut_milk.html b/site/coconut_milk.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut milk</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut milk</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_milk.png'/><p>Coconut milk is extracted from the grated pulp of mature coconuts. The rich taste of the milk is due to its high oil content. This high-fat milk is a perfect base for <a href='hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>. There are many varieties, differentiated on fat content: coconut cream (up to 50 percent fat), coconut milk (20 percent fat) and coconut skim milk (least fat). The terminology is not always described like this in products sold in western countries. Traditionally, coconut milk is made from grating the white inner flesh of mature coconuts and mixing the shredded pulp with a bit of hot water to suspend the fat in the pulp. The grating process was often done by hand.<br /><br /></p><h2>coconut</h2><p class='small'>Coconuts stem from the coconut tree, or <b>Cocos nucifera</b>. Coconuts are known for their versatility of uses, ranging from food to cosmetics. The water in young coconuts is very high in electrolytes. They are a good source of <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />They are ideal for making deserts, and are used in a variety of dishes like <a href='#hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>, beverages, frostings on cakes, smoothies, curry sauces etc. Whole coconuts will keep at room temperature for two weeks. For longer storage, refrigerate.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut milk</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut milk</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_milk.png'/><p>Coconut milk is extracted from the grated pulp of mature coconuts. The rich taste of the milk is due to its high oil content. This high-fat milk is a perfect base for <a href='hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>. There are many varieties, differentiated on fat content: coconut cream (up to 50 percent fat), coconut milk (20 percent fat) and coconut skim milk (least fat). The terminology is not always described like this in products sold in western countries. Traditionally, coconut milk is made from grating the white inner flesh of mature coconuts and mixing the shredded pulp with a bit of hot water to suspend the fat in the pulp. The grating process was often done by hand.<br /><br /></p><h2>coconut</h2><p class='small'>Coconuts stem from the coconut tree, or <b>Cocos nucifera</b>. Coconuts are known for their versatility of uses, ranging from food to cosmetics. The water in young coconuts is very high in electrolytes. They are a good source of <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />They are ideal for making deserts, and are used in a variety of dishes like <a href='#hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>, beverages, frostings on cakes, smoothies, curry sauces etc. Whole coconuts will keep at room temperature for two weeks. For longer storage, refrigerate.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coconut_oil.html b/site/coconut_oil.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut oil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut oil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><p>Coconut oil is an edible oil extracted from the meat of mature coconuts. It has a high-fat content, which makes it resistant to rancidification, lasting up to 6 months without spoiling.<br /><br />Coconut oil, as is the case for most cooking oils, isn't essential to good health and should be used sparingly.<br /><br /></p><h2>coconut</h2><p class='small'>Coconuts stem from the coconut tree, or <b>Cocos nucifera</b>. Coconuts are known for their versatility of uses, ranging from food to cosmetics. The water in young coconuts is very high in electrolytes. They are a good source of <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />They are ideal for making deserts, and are used in a variety of dishes like <a href='#hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>, beverages, frostings on cakes, smoothies, curry sauces etc. Whole coconuts will keep at room temperature for two weeks. For longer storage, refrigerate.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut oil</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut oil</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_oil.png'/><p>Coconut oil is an edible oil extracted from the meat of mature coconuts. It has a high-fat content, which makes it resistant to rancidification, lasting up to 6 months without spoiling.<br /><br />Coconut oil, as is the case for most cooking oils, isn't essential to good health and should be used sparingly.<br /><br /></p><h2>coconut</h2><p class='small'>Coconuts stem from the coconut tree, or <b>Cocos nucifera</b>. Coconuts are known for their versatility of uses, ranging from food to cosmetics. The water in young coconuts is very high in electrolytes. They are a good source of <b>protein</b>, <b>iron</b> and <b>zinc</b>.<br /><br />They are ideal for making deserts, and are used in a variety of dishes like <a href='#hop_ice_cream.html'>ice cream</a>, beverages, frostings on cakes, smoothies, curry sauces etc. Whole coconuts will keep at room temperature for two weeks. For longer storage, refrigerate.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coconut_sugar.html b/site/coconut_sugar.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut sugar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut sugar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_sugar.png'/><p>Coconut sugar has a caramel-like flavor, and is subtly sweet. It is produced from the sap of the flower bud stem of the coconut palm. It is used as a sweetener in many countries. Coconut sugar isn't highly processed, and so its flavor can vary depending on what species was used and where/when it was harvested. Coconut sugar is not essential to good health and should be consumed in moderation.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coconut sugar</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coconut sugar</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coconut_sugar.png'/><p>Coconut sugar has a caramel-like flavor, and is subtly sweet. It is produced from the sap of the flower bud stem of the coconut palm. It is used as a sweetener in many countries. Coconut sugar isn't highly processed, and so its flavor can vary depending on what species was used and where/when it was harvested. Coconut sugar is not essential to good health and should be consumed in moderation.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coffee.html b/site/coffee.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coffee</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coffee</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coffee.png'/><p>Coffee is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, which are the seeds of berries from the <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffea' target='_blank'>Coffea plant</a>.</p><h2>beans</h2><p class='small'>Beans are the seeds of many plants, applied generally to many other seeds of similar form like <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, peas, <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> etc. Beans are an important source of <b>Protein</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coffee</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coffee</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coffee.png'/><p>Coffee is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, which are the seeds of berries from the <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffea' target='_blank'>Coffea plant</a>.</p><h2>beans</h2><p class='small'>Beans are the seeds of many plants, applied generally to many other seeds of similar form like <a href='soybeans.html'>soybeans</a>, peas, <a href='chickpeas.html'>chickpeas</a> etc. Beans are an important source of <b>Protein</b>.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coffee_jelly.html b/site/coffee_jelly.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coffee jelly</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>coffee jelly</h1><h2>2 servings — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/coffee_jelly.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Coffee jelly is a popular dessert and drink (you could say) that is served in coffee shops in Japan. It is very simple to make, it doesn't require refrigeration to become jelly and it is delicious!<br /><br />The key ingredient in this recipe is kanten, or agar agar, a gelling agent that is algae based and that is widely available in asia. It is available in powder form, and also in sheets. Sheets can be melted in a liquid the same way as the powder form. Agar agar has no calories, and imparts no flavour.<br /><br />You can use instant coffee as well for this recipe, using 2 tbsp of instant coffee per cup.<br /><br />On Pino, we sometimes make the mix without a sweetener, and pour a spoonful on top afterwards.<br /><br /><b>Quick soy pudding</b><br /><br />You can eat the coffee jelly as is, or you can add the cubes in another recipe like a coconut or soy milk pudding. It can also be used as a garnish for other desserts.<br /><br />Also, I sometimes make a quick 'soy pudding' by heating some soy milk in a pan with some arrowroot starch. The mixture will thicken, it becomes pudding-like and is delicious over coffee jelly.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>jelly</h3><dt><a href='coffee.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coffee.png'/><b>coffee</b> <u>350 ml</u></a></dt><dt><a href='agar_agar_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/agar_agar_powder.png'/><b>agar agar powder</b> <u>4 g</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Brew a pot of <a href='coffee.html'>coffee</a>.</li><li>Pour 350ml of coffee into a saucepan, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> and bring to a boil,</li><li>Lower heat, then add <i>4g</i> (around <i>2 tsp</i>) of <a href='agar_agar_powder.html'>agar agar powder</a>. Stir constantly for <u>2 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the mixture into two small bowls, or cups. Let stand for <u>30 minutes and up to 1 hour</u>. It doesn't need to be refrigerated to solidify, but you can do that if you prefer it cold.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coffee jelly</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>coffee jelly</h1><h2>2 servings — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/coffee_jelly.jpg'/><p class='col2'>Coffee jelly is a popular dessert and drink (you could say) that is served in coffee shops in Japan. It is very simple to make, it doesn't require refrigeration to become jelly and it is delicious!<br /><br />The key ingredient in this recipe is kanten, or agar agar, a gelling agent that is algae based and that is widely available in asia. It is available in powder form, and also in sheets. Sheets can be melted in a liquid the same way as the powder form. Agar agar has no calories, and imparts no flavour.<br /><br />You can use instant coffee as well for this recipe, using 2 tbsp of instant coffee per cup.<br /><br />On Pino, we sometimes make the mix without a sweetener, and pour a spoonful on top afterwards.<br /><br /><b>Quick soy pudding</b><br /><br />You can eat the coffee jelly as is, or you can add the cubes in another recipe like a coconut or soy milk pudding. It can also be used as a garnish for other desserts.<br /><br />Also, I sometimes make a quick 'soy pudding' by heating some soy milk in a pan with some arrowroot starch. The mixture will thicken, it becomes pudding-like and is delicious over coffee jelly.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>jelly</h3><dt><a href='coffee.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coffee.png'/><b>coffee</b> <u>350 ml</u></a></dt><dt><a href='agar_agar_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/agar_agar_powder.png'/><b>agar agar powder</b> <u>4 g</u></a></dt><dt><a href='maple_syrup.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/maple_syrup.png'/><b>maple syrup</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Brew a pot of <a href='coffee.html'>coffee</a>.</li><li>Pour 350ml of coffee into a saucepan, add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a> and bring to a boil,</li><li>Lower heat, then add <i>4g</i> (around <i>2 tsp</i>) of <a href='agar_agar_powder.html'>agar agar powder</a>. Stir constantly for <u>2 minutes</u>.</li><li>Pour the mixture into two small bowls, or cups. Let stand for <u>30 minutes and up to 1 hour</u>. It doesn't need to be refrigerated to solidify, but you can do that if you prefer it cold.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/coriander.html b/site/coriander.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coriander</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coriander</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coriander.png'/><p>Coriander, also known as <b>Coriandrum sativum} or cilantro, is an herb cultivated for its leaves and seeds (all parts are edible). Coriander has a tart, lemon/lime taste. Coriander leaves are a source of <b>vitamin A</b>, <b>vitamin C</b>. The seeds have a lower count of vitamins but still provide some amounts of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>. For 3-21 percent of people, Coriander tastes soapy or rotten. These people have a gene which detects specific compounds in the plant, the most common is <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=8590' target='_blank'>OR6A2</a>, a gene involved in sensing smells.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — coriander</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>coriander</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/coriander.png'/><p>Coriander, also known as <b>Coriandrum sativum} or cilantro, is an herb cultivated for its leaves and seeds (all parts are edible). Coriander has a tart, lemon/lime taste. Coriander leaves are a source of <b>vitamin A</b>, <b>vitamin C</b>. The seeds have a lower count of vitamins but still provide some amounts of <b>calcium</b> and <b>iron</b>. For 3-21 percent of people, Coriander tastes soapy or rotten. These people have a gene which detects specific compounds in the plant, the most common is <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=8590' target='_blank'>OR6A2</a>, a gene involved in sensing smells.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/corn_dumplings.html b/site/corn_dumplings.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn dumplings</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>corn dumplings</h1><h2>2 people — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/corn_dumplings.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Alofi, Niue.<br /><br />I found an old vegetarian cookbook in a book-sharing shelf. I must have spent an hour reading through it, the recipes were fantastic, the title read "The Farm Vegetarian Cookbook". The cookbook had an entire section dedicated to cooking with corn. It's in there that I found a recipe for masa dumplings.<br /><br />Masa is corn that is simmered and ground into a paste and is the base for many recipes. You can make Mexican-style tortillas with it, that, or you can use it to make dumplings! I don't have access to fresh corn, nor do I have the space or the time to make my own masa, but I used <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> instead and it worked! The only difference is that you need to add boiling water so you can roll the mixture into balls. If you were to use masa, you wouldn't need the added moisture.<br /><br />The texture of the dumplings is fun and chewy. The outside is soft, but the inside is like that of dense cornbread.<br /><br />Recommendations</b><br /><br />Devine & I enjoy eating it with tomato sauce or with a spicy apricot sauce. Instead of apricot jam, you can add apricot juice to the mix (orange will taste wonderful too). I added jam because I didn't have any juice on the boat, and besides, it works well in this recipe.<br /><br />Adding extra spices, like cumin, chili flakes and turmeric will add a nice flavour to the dumpling mix.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dumplings</h3><dt><a href='corn_semolina.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><b>corn semolina</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup, boiled</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>1 cup</i> <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a>, <i>1/4 cup</i> <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a>, and <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>. Stir until well mixed.</li><li>Bring <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, pour into dry ingredients and mix well. When the dough is wet and sticky, form <b>1/2" balls</b> with your hands. You can make larger or smaller balls - note that cooking time will change if the diameter is bigger.</li><li>Bring a big pot of water to a boil, add corn balls and boil for <u>10-15 minutes</u>.</li><li>Drain, let cool.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sauce</h3><dt><a href='apricot_jam.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apricot_jam.png'/><b>apricot jam</b> <u>3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='japanese_rice_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/japanese_rice_vinegar.png'/><b>japanese rice vinegar</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='ginger_root.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/ginger_root.png'/><b>ginger root</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>2, minced</u></a></dt><dt><a href='arrowroot_starch.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/arrowroot_starch.png'/><b>arrowroot starch</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix all sauce ingredients together (all, except the arrowroot starch).</li><li>Put <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='arrowroot_starch.html'>arrowroot starch</a> in a bowl, and dissolve in <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Set aside.</li><li>Pour sauce into a pan, and bring to medium heat. Once the sauce starts to boil, add a few spoonfuls of the arrowroot starch mix to thicken the sauce. Once thickened, divide corn dumplings into bowls and pour sauce overtop.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn dumplings</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>corn dumplings</h1><h2>2 people — 40 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/corn_dumplings.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Alofi, Niue.<br /><br />I found an old vegetarian cookbook in a book-sharing shelf. I must have spent an hour reading through it, the recipes were fantastic, the title read "The Farm Vegetarian Cookbook". The cookbook had an entire section dedicated to cooking with corn. It's in there that I found a recipe for masa dumplings.<br /><br />Masa is corn that is simmered and ground into a paste and is the base for many recipes. You can make Mexican-style tortillas with it, that, or you can use it to make dumplings! I don't have access to fresh corn, nor do I have the space or the time to make my own masa, but I used <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a> instead and it worked! The only difference is that you need to add boiling water so you can roll the mixture into balls. If you were to use masa, you wouldn't need the added moisture.<br /><br />The texture of the dumplings is fun and chewy. The outside is soft, but the inside is like that of dense cornbread.<br /><br />Recommendations</b><br /><br />Devine & I enjoy eating it with tomato sauce or with a spicy apricot sauce. Instead of apricot jam, you can add apricot juice to the mix (orange will taste wonderful too). I added jam because I didn't have any juice on the boat, and besides, it works well in this recipe.<br /><br />Adding extra spices, like cumin, chili flakes and turmeric will add a nice flavour to the dumpling mix.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dumplings</h3><dt><a href='corn_semolina.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><b>corn semolina</b> <u>1 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_soda.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_soda.png'/><b>baking soda</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='baking_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/baking_powder.png'/><b>baking powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1 cup, boiled</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>1 cup</i> <a href='corn_semolina.html'>corn semolina</a>, <i>1/4 cup</i> <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a>, <i>1/2 tsp</i> <a href='baking_soda.html'>baking soda</a>, <i>1 tsp</i> <a href='baking_powder.html'>baking powder</a>, and <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>. Stir until well mixed.</li><li>Bring <i>1 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> to a boil, pour into dry ingredients and mix well. When the dough is wet and sticky, form <b>1/2" balls</b> with your hands. You can make larger or smaller balls - note that cooking time will change if the diameter is bigger.</li><li>Bring a big pot of water to a boil, add corn balls and boil for <u>10-15 minutes</u>.</li><li>Drain, let cool.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>sauce</h3><dt><a href='apricot_jam.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/apricot_jam.png'/><b>apricot jam</b> <u>3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='japanese_rice_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/japanese_rice_vinegar.png'/><b>japanese rice vinegar</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='lemon_juice.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/lemon_juice.png'/><b>lemon juice</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/chili_pepper_flakes.png'/><b>chili pepper flakes</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='ginger_root.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/ginger_root.png'/><b>ginger root</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>2, minced</u></a></dt><dt><a href='arrowroot_starch.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/arrowroot_starch.png'/><b>arrowroot starch</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix all sauce ingredients together (all, except the arrowroot starch).</li><li>Put <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='arrowroot_starch.html'>arrowroot starch</a> in a bowl, and dissolve in <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Set aside.</li><li>Pour sauce into a pan, and bring to medium heat. Once the sauce starts to boil, add a few spoonfuls of the arrowroot starch mix to thicken the sauce. Once thickened, divide corn dumplings into bowls and pour sauce overtop.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/corn_semolina.html b/site/corn_semolina.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn semolina</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>corn semolina</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><p>Corn semolina is the coarse middlings from maize (corn).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn semolina</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>corn semolina</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/corn_semolina.png'/><p>Corn semolina is the coarse middlings from maize (corn).</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/corn_tortillas.html b/site/corn_tortillas.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn tortillas</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>corn tortillas</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/corn_tortillas.png'/><p>Torillas, or <b>little cakes</b>, are thin unleavened flatbreads made from hominy (corn). There are 3 colors: white maize, yellow maize and blue maize, white and yellow being the most common. Tortillas are made by curing maize in limewater, making <b>niacin (vitamin B3)</b> and the <b>amino acid tryptophan</b> bioavailable (see <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra'>Pellagra</a>).<br /><br />Cooking tortillas in limewater causes the corn kernels to peel off, it is then ground, cooked and kneaded into a dough, which is in turn pressed flat into patties using a rolling pin or a tortilla press and then cooked on a hot griddle. </p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — corn tortillas</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>corn tortillas</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/corn_tortillas.png'/><p>Torillas, or <b>little cakes</b>, are thin unleavened flatbreads made from hominy (corn). There are 3 colors: white maize, yellow maize and blue maize, white and yellow being the most common. Tortillas are made by curing maize in limewater, making <b>niacin (vitamin B3)</b> and the <b>amino acid tryptophan</b> bioavailable (see <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra'>Pellagra</a>).<br /><br />Cooking tortillas in limewater causes the corn kernels to peel off, it is then ground, cooked and kneaded into a dough, which is in turn pressed flat into patties using a rolling pin or a tortilla press and then cooked on a hot griddle. </p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cornmeal.html b/site/cornmeal.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cornmeal</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cornmeal</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cornmeal.png'/><p>Cornmeal is a coarse flour made from dried corn (maize). It is ground to fine, medium and coarse consistencies for a variety of uses. Steel-ground yellow cornmeal (found in the US) has the husk and germ removed, while stone-ground cornmeal retains some of the hull and germ, giving it more nutrients and flavor. Cornmeal comes in many colors, from blue to violet, yellow and white.<br /><br />Cornmeal can be used to flour the baking surface to prevent sticking. Cornmeal can also be boiled (polenta), and be used in baking, to make muffins, flatbreads, breads, desserts (cornbread, cornpone etc). Steel-ground yellow cornmeal keeps for 1 year if stored in a cool, dry place within an airtight container. Stone-ground cornmeal is more perishable, but will store longer if refrigerated or kept in a cool place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cornmeal</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cornmeal</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cornmeal.png'/><p>Cornmeal is a coarse flour made from dried corn (maize). It is ground to fine, medium and coarse consistencies for a variety of uses. Steel-ground yellow cornmeal (found in the US) has the husk and germ removed, while stone-ground cornmeal retains some of the hull and germ, giving it more nutrients and flavor. Cornmeal comes in many colors, from blue to violet, yellow and white.<br /><br />Cornmeal can be used to flour the baking surface to prevent sticking. Cornmeal can also be boiled (polenta), and be used in baking, to make muffins, flatbreads, breads, desserts (cornbread, cornpone etc). Steel-ground yellow cornmeal keeps for 1 year if stored in a cool, dry place within an airtight container. Stone-ground cornmeal is more perishable, but will store longer if refrigerated or kept in a cool place.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cornstarch.html b/site/cornstarch.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cornstarch</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cornstarch</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cornstarch.png'/><p>Cornstarch is derived from corn (maize), it is obtained from the endosperm of the kernel. Cornstarch is used as a translucent thickener and anti-caking agent.<br /><br />Cornstarch is sometimes used to fry foods, a thin outer layer of starch increases oil absorption and adds crispiness.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cornstarch</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cornstarch</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cornstarch.png'/><p>Cornstarch is derived from corn (maize), it is obtained from the endosperm of the kernel. Cornstarch is used as a translucent thickener and anti-caking agent.<br /><br />Cornstarch is sometimes used to fry foods, a thin outer layer of starch increases oil absorption and adds crispiness.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/crackers.html b/site/crackers.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — crackers</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>crackers</h1><h2>40 crackers — 25 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/crackers.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Majuro, Marshall Islands.<br /><br />Making crackers is simple, everyone should know how to make them. There are no downsides to knowing, and in a bind it's a useful skill, but not just this, making your own produces less waste and you control what you ingest. What's great about a basic recipe is that you can swap ingredients with little consequence (most times) and you can add to it to suit your needs and cravings.<br /><br />Devine & I love to eat crackers as snacks, usually between breakfast and lunch, a cracker with some peanut butter to quiet our stomachs. We also like to eat <a href='https://grimgrains.com/#papaya+bruschetta+topping' target='_blank'>papaya salsa</a> with crackers, it makes a good scooping vessel for the fruit.<br /><br />You can make these crackers without extras with just the 'cracker' portion of the recipe. They're just as delicious that way, but you can add seeds and spices for added flavour and nutrition. I like to add seeds to mine, like <a href='pumpkin_seeds.html'>pumpkin seeds</a>, <a href='flax_seeds.html'>flax seeds</a>, <a href='sesame_seeds.html'>sesame seeds</a>, or <a href='sunflower_seeds.html'>sunflower seeds</a>. I recommend adding <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a>, or <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a>, these are also delicious if you sprinkle some salt over the top of them.<br /><br />In this recipe, I recommend using a mortar and pestle to grind the rolled oats, but a food processor will also work. You can use another sweetener - I used whole cane sugar because it's what's available to me at the moment, but otherwise I'd opt for <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>. I prefer to use a baking mat (I have a copper one) than parchment paper, since it's reusable and easy to clean.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>crackers</h3><dt><a href='spelt_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/spelt_flour.png'/><b>spelt flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rolled_oats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rolled_oats.png'/><b>rolled oats</b> <u>1/4 cup, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='olive_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/olive_oil.png'/><b>olive oil</b> <u>1 1/2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/4 cup + 2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>400F</u>.</li><li>In a mortar, grind <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='rolled_oats.html'>rolled oats</a> into a fine powder.</li><li>Mix the <i>1/4 cup</i> of powdered <a href='rolled_oats.html'>rolled oats</a> (rough-ish grind is fine) with <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='spelt_flour.html'>spelt flour</a>. Add <i>1/3 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a> as well as <i>1 1/2 tbsp</i> of <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>.</li><li>If you want to add extras, add them now, and stir well.</li><li>Add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Add an <i>extra tbsp</i> of water (sparingly!) if more moisture is needed and knead into a smooth ball.</li><li>Split dough in two. Set your first ball of dough onto a baking mat, or parchment paper, and roll the dough into a <i>thin (~3mm) sheet</i> with a rolling pin.</li><li><i>Score the dough</i> into cracker-sized squares, so they will be easier to separate afterwards. Repeat for the second ball of dough.</li><li>Bake for <u>10-12 minutes</u>, keeping an eye on them to make sure they don't burn. Let cool, and enjoy!</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>extras</h3><dt><a href='pumpkin_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pumpkin_seeds.png'/><b>pumpkin seeds</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>For more bulk, add pumpkin seeds, black sesame seeds and flax seeds!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — crackers</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>crackers</h1><h2>40 crackers — 25 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/crackers.jpg'/><p class='col2'><b>Recipe location:</b> Majuro, Marshall Islands.<br /><br />Making crackers is simple, everyone should know how to make them. There are no downsides to knowing, and in a bind it's a useful skill, but not just this, making your own produces less waste and you control what you ingest. What's great about a basic recipe is that you can swap ingredients with little consequence (most times) and you can add to it to suit your needs and cravings.<br /><br />Devine & I love to eat crackers as snacks, usually between breakfast and lunch, a cracker with some peanut butter to quiet our stomachs. We also like to eat <a href='https://grimgrains.com/#papaya+bruschetta+topping' target='_blank'>papaya salsa</a> with crackers, it makes a good scooping vessel for the fruit.<br /><br />You can make these crackers without extras with just the 'cracker' portion of the recipe. They're just as delicious that way, but you can add seeds and spices for added flavour and nutrition. I like to add seeds to mine, like <a href='pumpkin_seeds.html'>pumpkin seeds</a>, <a href='flax_seeds.html'>flax seeds</a>, <a href='sesame_seeds.html'>sesame seeds</a>, or <a href='sunflower_seeds.html'>sunflower seeds</a>. I recommend adding <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a>, or <a href='chili_pepper_flakes.html'>chili pepper flakes</a>, these are also delicious if you sprinkle some salt over the top of them.<br /><br />In this recipe, I recommend using a mortar and pestle to grind the rolled oats, but a food processor will also work. You can use another sweetener - I used whole cane sugar because it's what's available to me at the moment, but otherwise I'd opt for <a href='maple_syrup.html'>maple syrup</a>. I prefer to use a baking mat (I have a copper one) than parchment paper, since it's reusable and easy to clean.<br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>crackers</h3><dt><a href='spelt_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/spelt_flour.png'/><b>spelt flour</b> <u>3/4 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='rolled_oats.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/rolled_oats.png'/><b>rolled oats</b> <u>1/4 cup, ground</u></a></dt><dt><a href='olive_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/olive_oil.png'/><b>olive oil</b> <u>1 1/2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/whole_cane_sugar.png'/><b>whole cane sugar</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/salt.png'/><b>salt</b> <u>1/3 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/4 cup + 2 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Preheat oven to <u>400F</u>.</li><li>In a mortar, grind <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='rolled_oats.html'>rolled oats</a> into a fine powder.</li><li>Mix the <i>1/4 cup</i> of powdered <a href='rolled_oats.html'>rolled oats</a> (rough-ish grind is fine) with <i>3/4 cup</i> of <a href='spelt_flour.html'>spelt flour</a>. Add <i>1/3 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a>, <i>1 tbsp</i> of <a href='whole_cane_sugar.html'>whole cane sugar</a> as well as <i>1 1/2 tbsp</i> of <a href='olive_oil.html'>olive oil</a>.</li><li>If you want to add extras, add them now, and stir well.</li><li>Add <i>1/4 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a>. Add an <i>extra tbsp</i> of water (sparingly!) if more moisture is needed and knead into a smooth ball.</li><li>Split dough in two. Set your first ball of dough onto a baking mat, or parchment paper, and roll the dough into a <i>thin (~3mm) sheet</i> with a rolling pin.</li><li><i>Score the dough</i> into cracker-sized squares, so they will be easier to separate afterwards. Repeat for the second ball of dough.</li><li>Bake for <u>10-12 minutes</u>, keeping an eye on them to make sure they don't burn. Let cool, and enjoy!</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>extras</h3><dt><a href='pumpkin_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/pumpkin_seeds.png'/><b>pumpkin seeds</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_sesame_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_sesame_seeds.png'/><b>black sesame seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='flax_seeds.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/flax_seeds.png'/><b>flax seeds</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>For more bulk, add pumpkin seeds, black sesame seeds and flax seeds!</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/crimini.html b/site/crimini.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — crimini</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>crimini</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/crimini.png'/><p>Crimini mushrooms, or <b>Agaricus bisporus</b>, are immature <a href='portobello_mushrooms.html'>portobello mushrooms</a>. They are brown and known under a variety of other names, like swiss brown, roman brown, italian brown and chestnut.</p><h2>mushroom</h2><p class='small'>Mushrooms are the fleshy fruiting body of a fungus. They grow above ground, soil or from a food source. UV ray-treated (due to both sunlight and articial UV light tech) mushrooms are a source of <b>vitamin d2</b>. Many mushrooms are poisonous, resembling certain edible species. Gathering mushrooms in the wild is risky for the inexperienced and should only be undertaken by persons knowledgeable in mushroom identification.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — crimini</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>crimini</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/crimini.png'/><p>Crimini mushrooms, or <b>Agaricus bisporus</b>, are immature <a href='portobello_mushrooms.html'>portobello mushrooms</a>. They are brown and known under a variety of other names, like swiss brown, roman brown, italian brown and chestnut.</p><h2>mushroom</h2><p class='small'>Mushrooms are the fleshy fruiting body of a fungus. They grow above ground, soil or from a food source. UV ray-treated (due to both sunlight and articial UV light tech) mushrooms are a source of <b>vitamin d2</b>. Many mushrooms are poisonous, resembling certain edible species. Gathering mushrooms in the wild is risky for the inexperienced and should only be undertaken by persons knowledgeable in mushroom identification.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cucumber.html b/site/cucumber.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cucumber</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cucumber</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cucumber.png'/><p>There are many varieties of cucumbers, but the 3 main are: slicing, pickling and seedless. Cucumbers are 95 percent water, making them a low-energy food.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cucumber</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cucumber</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cucumber.png'/><p>There are many varieties of cucumbers, but the 3 main are: slicing, pickling and seedless. Cucumbers are 95 percent water, making them a low-energy food.</p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/cumin_seeds.html b/site/cumin_seeds.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cumin seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cumin seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cumin_seeds.png'/><p>Cumin, or <b>Cuminum cymimum</b> is a plant of the family <b>Apiaceae</b>. It's seeds are dried and used both whole and ground. Cumin seed is used as a spice for its distinctive flavour and aroma, it imparts an earthy, warming and aromatic character to food. Cumin is a source of <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Cumin is often confused with caraway (Carum carvi), and many European languages don't distinguish between the two. <b>Nigella sativa</b>, or black cumin, is distantly related and also sometimes confused with cumin.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — cumin seeds</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>cumin seeds</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/cumin_seeds.png'/><p>Cumin, or <b>Cuminum cymimum</b> is a plant of the family <b>Apiaceae</b>. It's seeds are dried and used both whole and ground. Cumin seed is used as a spice for its distinctive flavour and aroma, it imparts an earthy, warming and aromatic character to food. Cumin is a source of <b>iron</b>.<br /><br />Cumin is often confused with caraway (Carum carvi), and many European languages don't distinguish between the two. <b>Nigella sativa</b>, or black cumin, is distantly related and also sometimes confused with cumin.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/curry_powder.html b/site/curry_powder.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — curry powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>curry powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/curry_powder.png'/><p>Curry powder is a spice blend, which contains more or less the same set of ingredients in varying quantities. Most mixes contain coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek, and chili peppers. Other ingredients included in curry powders include ginger, garlic, asafoetida, fennel seed, caraway, cinnamon, clove, mustard seed, green cardamom, black cardamom, nutmeg, white turmeric, curry leaf, long pepper, and black pepper.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — curry powder</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>curry powder</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/curry_powder.png'/><p>Curry powder is a spice blend, which contains more or less the same set of ingredients in varying quantities. Most mixes contain coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek, and chili peppers. Other ingredients included in curry powders include ginger, garlic, asafoetida, fennel seed, caraway, cinnamon, clove, mustard seed, green cardamom, black cardamom, nutmeg, white turmeric, curry leaf, long pepper, and black pepper.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/daikon.html b/site/daikon.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — daikon</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>daikon</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/daikon.png'/><p>Daikon ('great root' in Japanese), or <b>Brassicaceae raphanus sativus</b>, is a mild-flavored winter radish, originating from southeast asia. It has a mild and tangy flavor, with a crisp texture. Daikon is low in food energy, but is a good source of <b>vitamin C</b>. There are many varieties of daikon, with differences in color, taste and shape.<br /><br />Daikon can be pickled, boiled, eaten raw or grated and served as a garnish.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — daikon</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>daikon</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/daikon.png'/><p>Daikon ('great root' in Japanese), or <b>Brassicaceae raphanus sativus</b>, is a mild-flavored winter radish, originating from southeast asia. It has a mild and tangy flavor, with a crisp texture. Daikon is low in food energy, but is a good source of <b>vitamin C</b>. There are many varieties of daikon, with differences in color, taste and shape.<br /><br />Daikon can be pickled, boiled, eaten raw or grated and served as a garnish.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/dark_gyoza.html b/site/dark_gyoza.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — dark gyoza</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>dark gyoza</h1><h2>40 wrappers — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza.jpg'/><p class='col2'>We made homemade gyoza dough with some friends a few weeks back, and it took FOREVER. Devine had the amazing idea of using our pasta maker to do it. We still needed to do a bit of kneading, to get it through the machine the first time. After that, it's easy and sweat-free!<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_1.jpg'/><br /><br />We didn't have any round cookie cutters, the last time we tried I was using upside down glasses. Didn't work well because the rims aren't sharp and smooshes the dough down instead. Again, Devine had a stroke of genius: Cans! I had an empty chickpea pan lying around, it was about the size of a gyoza wrapper so we used that to poke holes through the dough.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_2.jpg'/><br /><br />I know not everyone has a pasta maker, you don't need one to make wrappers. You can just use a rolling pin.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_4.jpg'><br /><br />Gyoza wrapper techniques and ratios were based on the recipe from <a href='http://www.justonecookbook.com/recipes/gyoza-wrappers/' target='_blank'>Just one cookbook</a>. She explains it really well too on her blog it's worth taking a look. I learned a lot from her even if our techniques differ slightly. While I preferred not to knead by hand, or with a rolling pin, i did do it her way the first time.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_5.jpg'/><br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dough</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><b>bamboo charcoal powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cornstarch.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cornstarch.png'/><b>cornstarch</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>2 cups</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'>bamboo charcoal powder</a> in a bowl.</li><li>Dissolve <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> in <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='just-boiled_water.html'>just-boiled water</a>, and pour into the flour little by little while mixing.</li><li>Knead the dough on a clean flat surface for a few minutes until it becomes smooth. If your dough is too dry, add 1 tbsp of hot water and repeat as needed.</li><li><i>Separate the dough in 3</i>. Roll into balls and wrap them up with a bag or place in a lidded bowl, refrigerate for at least <u>30 minutes</u>. Leaving it to rest in the refrigerator makes the dough easier to manipulate afterwards.</li><li>Flatten each piece out with a rolling pin into a rough rectangle, thin enough so that you can run it through the pasta maker. Pass it through your pasta maker a few times, incrementing down to the thinnest setting gradually. You can use a rolling pin instead, it works but it takes a lot more effort. Both techniques work, this one just happens to be quicker and easier on your body. Note that depending on your pasta maker, the dough will come out a bit thicker than a traditional gyoza. If you want it thinner you can flatten it a bit more with a rolling pin.</li><li>Put the thin sheet of dough onto a clean flat surface. Take a can (with about a 3" diameter) and start to poke holes into it, these are your gyoza wrappers! You can use cookie cutters if you have some. I used an old chickpea can I had.</li><li>Pile the wrappers, sprinkle some <a href='cornstarch.html'>cornstarch</a> (or potato starch) inbetween each piece so they don't stick together. Put a damp towel over your wrappers so they don't dry out. Repeat this process for the other 2 portions of dough, and you can re-use the scraps and make new dough to run through the pasta maker.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>filling</h3><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>4</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tofu.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tofu.png'/><b>tofu</b> <u>1/2 block</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coriander.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coriander.png'/><b>coriander</b> <u>2/3 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>4 cloves</u></a></dt><dt><a href='ginger_root.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/ginger_root.png'/><b>ginger root</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix the <i>1/2 block</i> of <a href='tofu.html'>tofu</a>, the <i>2/3 cup</i> of <a href='coriander.html'>coriander</a>, the <i>4 grated</i> <a href='carrots.html'>carrots</a> and the <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='ginger_root.html'>ginger root</a> together in a bowl. Add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a> as well as <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a> and <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> to taste. Mix.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dipping sauce</h3><dt><a href='japanese_rice_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/japanese_rice_vinegar.png'/><b>japanese rice vinegar</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Combine <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='Japanese_rice_vinegar.html'>Japanese rice vinegar</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a>.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>pan fry</h3><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/3 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Take 1 gyoza wrapper (<a href='#dark_gyoza_wrappers.html'>see recipe</a>), wet all around the edge with water using your fingers. Keep a bowl of water close to dip your fingers in.</li><li>Put a spoonful of filling in the middle.</li><li>Close it. Make little folds with the flap that is facing you using both hands, leaving the back part smooth. Make sure it's sealed tight. Repeat for the rest of the gyoza skins, alternate between fillings. Cover with a damp towel while you work so they don't dry up.</li><li>Put some vegetable oil in a pan on medium heat. Add gyoza in 2 rows of 3 in the pan. Cook until bottom becomes golden.</li><li>Add <i>1/3 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> and put a lid on. Let steam until all the water evaporates.</li><li>Add a bit of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a> and cook until crispy.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — dark gyoza</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='recipe'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='recipe'><h1>dark gyoza</h1><h2>40 wrappers — 60 minutes</h2><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza.jpg'/><p class='col2'>We made homemade gyoza dough with some friends a few weeks back, and it took FOREVER. Devine had the amazing idea of using our pasta maker to do it. We still needed to do a bit of kneading, to get it through the machine the first time. After that, it's easy and sweat-free!<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_1.jpg'/><br /><br />We didn't have any round cookie cutters, the last time we tried I was using upside down glasses. Didn't work well because the rims aren't sharp and smooshes the dough down instead. Again, Devine had a stroke of genius: Cans! I had an empty chickpea pan lying around, it was about the size of a gyoza wrapper so we used that to poke holes through the dough.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_2.jpg'/><br /><br />I know not everyone has a pasta maker, you don't need one to make wrappers. You can just use a rolling pin.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_4.jpg'><br /><br />Gyoza wrapper techniques and ratios were based on the recipe from <a href='http://www.justonecookbook.com/recipes/gyoza-wrappers/' target='_blank'>Just one cookbook</a>. She explains it really well too on her blog it's worth taking a look. I learned a lot from her even if our techniques differ slightly. While I preferred not to knead by hand, or with a rolling pin, i did do it her way the first time.<br /><br /><img src='../media/recipes/dark_gyoza_5.jpg'/><br /><br /></p><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dough</h3><dt><a href='all_purpose_flour.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/all_purpose_flour.png'/><b>all purpose flour</b> <u>2 cups</u></a></dt><dt><a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/bamboo_charcoal_powder.png'/><b>bamboo charcoal powder</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/2 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='cornstarch.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/cornstarch.png'/><b>cornstarch</b> <u>1 tbsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix <i>2 cups</i> of <a href='all_purpose_flour.html'>all purpose flour</a> with <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='bamboo_charcoal_powder.html'>bamboo charcoal powder</a> in a bowl.</li><li>Dissolve <i>1/2 tsp</i> of <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> in <i>1/2 cup</i> of <a href='just-boiled_water.html'>just-boiled water</a>, and pour into the flour little by little while mixing.</li><li>Knead the dough on a clean flat surface for a few minutes until it becomes smooth. If your dough is too dry, add 1 tbsp of hot water and repeat as needed.</li><li><i>Separate the dough in 3</i>. Roll into balls and wrap them up with a bag or place in a lidded bowl, refrigerate for at least <u>30 minutes</u>. Leaving it to rest in the refrigerator makes the dough easier to manipulate afterwards.</li><li>Flatten each piece out with a rolling pin into a rough rectangle, thin enough so that you can run it through the pasta maker. Pass it through your pasta maker a few times, incrementing down to the thinnest setting gradually. You can use a rolling pin instead, it works but it takes a lot more effort. Both techniques work, this one just happens to be quicker and easier on your body. Note that depending on your pasta maker, the dough will come out a bit thicker than a traditional gyoza. If you want it thinner you can flatten it a bit more with a rolling pin.</li><li>Put the thin sheet of dough onto a clean flat surface. Take a can (with about a 3" diameter) and start to poke holes into it, these are your gyoza wrappers! You can use cookie cutters if you have some. I used an old chickpea can I had.</li><li>Pile the wrappers, sprinkle some <a href='cornstarch.html'>cornstarch</a> (or potato starch) inbetween each piece so they don't stick together. Put a damp towel over your wrappers so they don't dry out. Repeat this process for the other 2 portions of dough, and you can re-use the scraps and make new dough to run through the pasta maker.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>filling</h3><dt><a href='carrots.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/carrots.png'/><b>carrots</b> <u>4</u></a></dt><dt><a href='tofu.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/tofu.png'/><b>tofu</b> <u>1/2 block</u></a></dt><dt><a href='coriander.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/coriander.png'/><b>coriander</b> <u>2/3 cup</u></a></dt><dt><a href='garlic.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/garlic.png'/><b>garlic</b> <u>4 cloves</u></a></dt><dt><a href='ginger_root.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/ginger_root.png'/><b>ginger root</b> <u>2 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>2 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='black_pepper.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/black_pepper.png'/><b>black pepper</b> <u>pinch</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sea_salt.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sea_salt.png'/><b>sea salt</b> <u>1/2 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Mix the <i>1/2 block</i> of <a href='tofu.html'>tofu</a>, the <i>2/3 cup</i> of <a href='coriander.html'>coriander</a>, the <i>4 grated</i> <a href='carrots.html'>carrots</a> and the <i>2 tsp</i> of <a href='ginger_root.html'>ginger root</a> together in a bowl. Add <i>2 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a> as well as <a href='black_pepper.html'>black pepper</a> and <a href='salt.html'>salt</a> to taste. Mix.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>dipping sauce</h3><dt><a href='japanese_rice_vinegar.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/japanese_rice_vinegar.png'/><b>japanese rice vinegar</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='soy_sauce.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/soy_sauce.png'/><b>soy sauce</b> <u>3 tbsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Combine <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='Japanese_rice_vinegar.html'>Japanese rice vinegar</a> with <i>3 tbsp</i> of <a href='soy_sauce.html'>soy sauce</a> and <i>1 tsp</i> of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a>.</li></ul><dl class='ingredients'><h3>pan fry</h3><dt><a href='sesame_oil.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/sesame_oil.png'/><b>sesame oil</b> <u>1 tsp</u></a></dt><dt><a href='water.html'><img src='../media/ingredients/water.png'/><b>water</b> <u>1/3 cup</u></a></dt></dl><ul class='instructions'><li>Take 1 gyoza wrapper (<a href='#dark_gyoza_wrappers.html'>see recipe</a>), wet all around the edge with water using your fingers. Keep a bowl of water close to dip your fingers in.</li><li>Put a spoonful of filling in the middle.</li><li>Close it. Make little folds with the flap that is facing you using both hands, leaving the back part smooth. Make sure it's sealed tight. Repeat for the rest of the gyoza skins, alternate between fillings. Cover with a damp towel while you work so they don't dry up.</li><li>Put some vegetable oil in a pan on medium heat. Add gyoza in 2 rows of 3 in the pan. Cook until bottom becomes golden.</li><li>Add <i>1/3 cup</i> of <a href='water.html'>water</a> and put a lid on. Let steam until all the water evaporates.</li><li>Add a bit of <a href='sesame_oil.html'>sesame oil</a> and cook until crispy.</li></ul></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/date_caramel.html b/site/date_caramel.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — date caramel</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>date caramel</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/date_caramel.png'/><p>A type of plant-based 'caramel' made from <a href='dates.html'>dates</a>.</p><h2>dates</h2><p class='small'>Dates are the fruit of the date palm (or Phoenix dactylifera) of the <b>Phoenix</b> genus, which contains 19 species of wild date palms. There are 3 classifications of dates: dry, semi-dry and soft. Date fruits range from bright red to bright yellow in color, and are very sweet with a sugar content of about 80 percent when dried. Dates are a source of <b>iron</b> and <b>protein</b>.<br /><br />Dry dates are often pitted and stuffed with a variety of fillings, like nuts, candied orange, tahini etc.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — date caramel</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>date caramel</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/date_caramel.png'/><p>A type of plant-based 'caramel' made from <a href='dates.html'>dates</a>.</p><h2>dates</h2><p class='small'>Dates are the fruit of the date palm (or Phoenix dactylifera) of the <b>Phoenix</b> genus, which contains 19 species of wild date palms. There are 3 classifications of dates: dry, semi-dry and soft. Date fruits range from bright red to bright yellow in color, and are very sweet with a sugar content of about 80 percent when dried. Dates are a source of <b>iron</b> and <b>protein</b>.<br /><br />Dry dates are often pitted and stuffed with a variety of fillings, like nuts, candied orange, tahini etc.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2020<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>+ \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/site/dates.html b/site/dates.html @@ -1 +1 @@ -<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — dates</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'>Nutrition</a></li><li class='right'><a href='http://twitter.com/grimgrains' target='_blank'>Twitter</a></li></ul></nav><main class='ingredient'><h1>dates</h1><img class='right' src='../media/ingredients/dates.png'/><p>Dates are the fruit of the date palm (or Phoenix dactylifera) of the <b>Phoenix</b> genus, which contains 19 species of wild date palms. There are 3 classifications of dates: dry, semi-dry and soft. Date fruits range from bright red to bright yellow in color, and are very sweet with a sugar content of about 80 percent when dried. Dates are a source of <b>iron</b> and <b>protein</b>.<br /><br />Dry dates are often pitted and stuffed with a variety of fillings, like nuts, candied orange, tahini etc.<br /><br /></p><hr/></main><footer><a href='about.html'>Grimgrains</a> © 2014—2019<br><a href='http://100r.co/' target='_blank'>Hundred Rabbits</a></footer></body></html>- \ No newline at end of file +<!DOCTYPE html><html lang='en'><head><meta charset='utf-8'><meta name='description' content='Grim Grains is an illustrated food blog, it features plant-based (vegan) recipes.'><meta name='viewport' content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0'><meta name='twitter:card' content='summary'><meta name='twitter:site' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta name='twitter:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta name='twitter:creator' content='@RekkaBell'><meta name='twitter:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:title' content='Grimgrains'><meta property='og:type' content='article'><meta property='og:url' content='http://grimgrains.com/'><meta property='og:image' content='https://grimgrains.com/media/services/icon.jpg'><meta property='og:description' content='An illustrated food blog.'><meta property='og:site_name' content='Grimgrains'><title>GrimGrains — dates</title><link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='../links/main.css'></head><body class='ingredient'><header><a id='logo' href='home.html'><img src='../media/interface/logo.png' alt='Grimgrains'></a></header><nav><ul><li class='home'><a href='home.html'>Home</a></li><li class='recipes'><a href='home.html#recipes'>Recipes</a></li><li class='about'><a href='about.html'>About</a></li><li class='tools'><a href='tools.html'>Tools</a></li><li class='nutrition'><a href='nutrition.html'&